RI Philharmonic Music School COVID-19 Update (March 18)

Friends,

In keeping with CDC and state mandates regarding the COVID-19 Coronavirus, we have made a number of difficult decisions over the past few days.  Currently, The Carter Center is closed to instruction through Sun. April 5, per instruction from Governor Raimondo, and all recitals, classes and rehearsals are cancelled or postponed through April 18.  These dates could change.  We will keep you updated.

For the duration of the shutdown, we are encouraging faculty and students to continue private instruction online through video chat programs such as Skype, Facetime, or Zoom. Please contact your teacher to discuss options for your family.  If you have any questions about virtual lessons, please email cartercenter@riphil.org

We have also postponed RIPO’s remaining Season 75 performances, including the March 29 Judith Stillman and FriendsApril 3-4 Beethoven and Ravel, and the May 1-2 Verdi Requiem.  At this point, we are making every effort to reschedule them.  It is also highly likely that RIPO will not be able to perform our LinkUp Education Concerts in May as planned.  We are exploring alternatives for producing these concerts in a manner that would be safe for orchestra members, staff, and the more than 11,000 students around the region who have been preparing for them. Currently, we intend to go ahead with the Gala on June 13, but that could change if public gathering restrictions are extended.  This is our largest single fundraiser, and provides considerable support for our need-based scholarships and education programs, so the fate of the Gala has tremendous implications for The Music School, as well as the overall Philharmonic organization..

In the past, we’ve been able to bring our community together through music during difficult times.  We hope to do so during this crisis.  We are exploring creative ways to reach people in their homes via online broadcasts from RIPO’s live recording archives, links to curated resources, as well as an opportunity to learn online from the incredible artists of our Orchestra and Music School. Stay tuned for more details on this.

We are particularly focused on lessening the financial impact of this crisis on everyone whose income is directly linked to the concerts we perform and the lessons and classes we teach. This includes our faculty.  As music school students you can help support your teachers in the following ways:

  • Schedule virtual private lessons while the Carter Center is closed
  • Reschedule missed lessons once activities resume
  • Donate tuition payments for any lessons that you are not able to reschedule.

In addition to above, you can support our RIPO&MS Musician and Staff Relief Fund online here, through the Box Office, or by reaching out to our development team directly at 401 248-7034.  We will use this fund to mitigate the impact of this crisis on faculty, orchestra members and staff.

Please call or email the Music School at 401.248.7001/cartercenter@riphil.org with any questions. To ensure the safety of everyone at RIPO&MS, our staff is working remotely until further notice. Some phone lines are forwarded, and we are checking voice and email regularly.

These are difficult times.  Your Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School will be here throughout the coming weeks and months, and well beyond, bringing inspiration and lifting spirits.  We look forward to welcoming you back just as soon as live music and instruction can return.

Sincerely,

David Beauchesne, Executive Director, Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra and Music School

Annette Mozzoni, Director of Education and Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School

Christine Eldridge, Assistant Director of Education and Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School

RI Philharmonic Concert Schedule Update

Friends:

In keeping with CDC and state mandates regarding the COVID-19 Coronavirus, the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra is postponing the following upcoming events…

• March 29: Judith Stillman and Friends

• April 3 & 4: Beethoven & Ravel

• May 1 & 2: Verdi Requiem 

The RI Philharmonic regrets this interruption to our TACO Classical and Amica Rush Hour Series, and performances at The Carter Center, but the health and safety of our community comes first. We will communicate new concert dates once they are finalized.

You have counted on us in the past to bring our community together through music during difficult times. In spite of the public gathering ban, we will attempt to do so during this crisis as well. We are exploring ways to get RIPO to you via online broadcasts from our live recording archive, as well as opportunities to learn music online from the incredible artists of our orchestra and school. Please stay tuned for information as we develop these resources.

“HOW CAN I HELP THE RHODE ISLAND PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA & MUSIC SCHOOL?” 

Many patrons have asked how they can help the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School in this challenging time. We thank you for your concern and suggest…

  • If your schedule conflicts with the rescheduled performances, please consider donating the value of your tickets to the Rhode Island Philharmonic’s annual fund. Your tax-deductible ticket donation adds to the financial stability of our mission and organization, which will be tested in the weeks and months ahead.
  • When you donate your tickets, you will receive two free vouchers to select Rhode Island Philharmonic performances in the coming year – please share with friends and neighbors and help us welcome them into the RIPO family.
  • You may exchange your tickets into select concerts during the 2020-21 season. You can find a listing of the season at RIPhil.org. You may also apply the value of your tickets to a subscription next season.

Any additional financial contribution that you can make is greatly appreciated. We are particularly focused on lessening the impact of this crisis on faculty, orchestra members and staff whose income is directly linked to the concerts we perform and lessons and classes we teach. In addition to donating your tickets, you can support our RIPO&MS Musician and Staff Relief Fund online here, through the Box Office, or by reaching out to our development team directly at 401-248-7034.

Please call or email the Box Office at 401.248.7000/boxoffice@riphil.org with any questions. To ensure the safety of everyone at RIPO&MS, our staff is working remotely until further notice. Some phone lines are forwarded, and we are checking voice and email regularly. We will respond to your questions and concerns as quickly as possible. Replacement tickets will be mailed once we have secured new dates. If you cannot attend a rescheduled concert and would prefer a refund versus donating, you may request one.

These are difficult times.Your Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School will be here throughout the coming weeks and months, and well beyond, bringing inspiration and lifting spirits. We look forward to welcoming you back just as soon as live music and instruction can return.

Sincerely,

David Beauchesne
Executive Director, Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School

Bramwell Tovey
Artistic Advisor, Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School

Dated 3/18/2020

RHODE ISLAND PHILHARMONIC MUSIC SCHOOL TEMPORARILY SUSPENDS ALL ACTIVITIES THROUGH MARCH 22.

Effective Saturday, March 14, 2020:

Due to COVID-19/Coronavirus, The Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School will temporarily suspend all activities. All private lessons, group classes, ensembles and recital/rehearsal/performance activities are suspended through SUNDAY, MARCH 22. At that time, we will consider opening only for private instruction and plan to resume all activities on SATURDAY, APRIL 18.

Online based private instruction through video chat programs such as Skype, Facetime, Zoom or other electronic delivery is an option during this suspension of activities. Students should contact their instructors to inquire about this option.

The Rhode Island Philharmonic fully supports the efforts of public health officials to control the spread of Coronavirus.   We are committed to the health and safety of our staff, faculty, students, audiences and musicians, and the larger community.  We will continue to follow all guidelines made by local, state or federal health officials, including rescheduling further activities, should that become necessary.

We are committed to the safety and wellness of our school community and will keep you informed on further updates.  We will continue to navigate the best we can and reschedule all possible activities as circumstances allow. Thanks for your patience and understanding during this time.

If you have any questions about this announcement, please contact the Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School at 401-248-7001.

Sincerely,

Annette Mozzoni

Director of Education and Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School

This Weekend’s RI Philharmonic Orchestra Concerts Postponed

Friends,

We have postponed both Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra concerts scheduled for this weekend, March 13 and 14, at the VETS.  We will make every effort to reschedule The Joyce Yang masterclass at Brown University on Sunday March 15 has been cancelled.

The Rhode Island Philharmonic and Music School fully supports the efforts of public health officials to control the spread of Coronavirus.   We are committed to the health and safety of our staff, faculty, students, audiences and musicians, and the larger community.  We will continue to follow all guidelines made by local, state or federal health officials, including rescheduling further activities, should that become necessary.

Tickets to the March concerts will be honored on the date of the rescheduled concert.  Single ticket buyers can also give the value of your tickets as a taxable donation or exchange them for a different upcoming concert.  Please contact the Box Office at boxoffice@riphil.org or 401.248.7000.  Our next regularly scheduled concert will be April 4 when we present Beethoven’s Symphony No.8.  Replacement dates for this weekend’s concerts, and any future schedule updates will be communicated via email, facebook.com/riphil and on riphil.org.

Activities at our Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School will continue as scheduled. State and federal officials have explicitly recommended that schools remain open.  Further, there are no music school activities scheduled that would involve groups of 250 or more.

The Rhode Island Department of Health has launched a 24-hour hotline for anyone with questions about the Coronavirus (401-222-8022). Residents can also call 211 after 4:30pm for assistance.

If you have any questions regarding this schedule change, or any other concert-related matter, please contact the Rhode Island Philharmonic Box Office at 401-248-7000. Thanks for your patience, support and understanding as we work to ensure good health for everyone involved in our programs and performances.

Sincerely,

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David Beauchesne

Executive Director, Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra  & Music School

PUBLIC HEALTH UPDATE: Coronavirus

Friends,

While the risk of Coronavirus/COVID-19 in Rhode Island is currently low, the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra is committed to the health and safety of our staff, audiences and musicians. We are closely monitoring CDC and RI Department of Health guidelines. At this time, all RIPO concerts will happen as scheduled.  We will follow all recommendations made by local, state or federal health officials, including cancelling performances, should that become necessary. If such a recommendation occurs, we will notify all ticket buyers by email or phone, and through updates at riphil.org  and facebook.com/riphil. In the meantime, along with our partners at The VETS, we are taking the following precautions for your health and comfort:

  • A sanitizing station has been installed at the front doors of The VETS.
  • VETS operations staff are continuously disinfecting commonly touched surfaces such as doors, railings, handles and elevator keypads.
  • Any orchestra members or staff at risk for exposure will not participate in this weekend’s performance.
  • We encourage those who feel unwell to stay home and are happy to offer complimentary ticket exchanges to anyone unable to attend.

We encourage everyone to take precautions to prevent the spread of flu, COVID-19 and other viruses. Here is the list provided by the Center for Disease Control:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with your elbow or a tissue
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily

The Rhode Island Department of Health has launched a 24-hour hotline for anyone with questions about the Coronavirus (401-222-8022). Residents can also call 211 after 4:30pm for assistance.

If you have any questions, please contact the Rhode Island Philharmonic Box Office at 401-248-7000. Thanks for your patience and understanding as we work to ensure good health for everyone involved in our programs or performances.

Sincerely,

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David Beauchesne

Executive Director, Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra  & Music School

Dated 3/10/2020

THE STORY BEHIND: Grieg’s Piano Concerto

On March 13 & 14, pianist Joyce Yang will join Bramwell Tovey and the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra for a program featuring Grieg’s Beloved Piano Concerto.

THE STORY BEHIND: Grieg’s Piano Concerto

Title: Piano Concerto, Op.16, A Minor

Composer: Edvard Grieg (1843–1907)

Last time performed by the Rhode Island Philharmonic: January 28, 2012 with Larry Rachleff conducting and soloist Alon Goldstein.

Orchestration: The piece is scored for a solo piano, piccolo, two each of flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings.

The Story: 

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The famous flourishing introduction to the concerto.

 

Although Edvard Grieg revered Chopin and was himself dubbed “the Chopin of the North,” he looked to Schumann as a guide for the first movement of his own Piano Concerto. Beginning with the same choice of key and the explosive introduction, Grieg ran parallel to Schumann’s Piano Concerto in technical and formal matters as well. This does not mean that Grieg’s music is unoriginal. His concerto is one of the freshest sounding heroic piano concertos of the Romantic Era, and when Liszt played it through, he was enthusiastic about its originality. This was a youthful work stemming from 1868, and it formed not only the climax to Grieg’s early period but also became the longest concert work of his entire output. Despite the concerto’s widespread success, the composer was never quite satisfied with it and continued to tinker with the orchestration throughout his life. Every change, however, was an improvement.

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Edvard Grieg

 

Grieg’s vast lyrical gifts are obvious in the themes throughout, but themes are more folk-like in the outer movements. He constructs these in small bits, repeating the main ideas often but never becoming static. In the first movement, he works on them thoroughly. Toward the end come the brilliant piano solo and a final section cleverly formed from the movement’s introductory material.

Grieg next unfolds a three-part Adagio. The orchestra alone expresses the ravishing main theme. The piano enters in the contrasting, lighter middle section and continues by accompanying the orchestra through a reprise of the main theme.

The finale follows without a break. It has a dance-like main theme that contrasts with the lyrical innocence of the second theme. Following a dramatic section and a brief piano solo, the first theme returns in a lighthearted transformation. Grieg then tops the originality of this gesture with a slower apotheosis of the second theme that also serves as the movement’s finale. Upon playing this, Liszt is said to have jumped up from the piano exclaiming, “Splendid! That’s the real thing. . . . Keep it up, I tell you. You have what it takes – and don’t let anyone scare you.”

Program Notes by Dr. Michael Fink © 2019 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

To purchase tickets visit tickets.riphil.org or call 401.248.7000

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MEET THE SOLOIST: Joyce Yang, piano: Grieg’s Beloved Piano Concerto, March 13 & 14, 2020

Joyce Yang, piano

Performs Grieg’s Beloved Piano Concerto

Amica Rush Hour Concert Series: March 13, 2020 at 6:30 p.m. at The VETS, Providence

TACO Classical Concert Series: March 14, 2020 at 8 p.m. at The VETS, Providence

 

Background:  Born in Seoul, South Korea, Ms. Yang moved to the United States in 1997 to begin studies at the pre-college division of The Juilliard School with Dr. Yoheved Kaplinsky. She first came to international attention in 2005 when she won the silver medal at the 12th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition.

 

Highlights:

  • Yang’s wide-ranging discography includes the world premiere recording of Michael Torke’s Piano Concerto, created expressly for Yang and commissioned by the Albany Symphony.
  • Yang appears in the film In the Heart of Music, a documentary about the 2005 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition.
  • Joyce was featured in a five-year Rachmaninoff concerto cycle with Edo de Waart and the Milwaukee Symphony.
  • Joyce is a Steinway artist.

Critical Praise:

  • “Her attention to detail and clarity is as impressive as her agility, balance and velocity” – Washington Post
  •  “The sound is bold and modern, yet restrained. The precision of the fingerwork is astounding” – BBC Music Magazine
  • “de Waart conducted Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3, with Joyce Yang, Silver Medalist of the 12th Van Cliburn International Competition, as the soloist … She played with a polished, pearly evenness that was remarkable for its ease up and down the keyboard” – Los Angeles Times
  • “Mr. Maazel led a taut performance (of Bernstein’s ‘Age of Anxiety’), and the orchestra played this dark-hued music vividly and with a sharp edge. But the standout was Joyce Yang, who gave a knockout performance of the alternately poetic, fiery and occasionally jazz-tinged piano line” – New York Times

To purchase tickets visit tickets.riphil.org or call 401.248.7000

THE STORY BEHIND: Murphy’s From the Drum Comes a Thundering Beat. . .

On March 13 & 14, pianist Joyce Yang will join Bramwell Tovey and the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra for a program featuring Grieg’s Beloved Piano Concerto.

THE STORY BEHIND: Murphy’s From the Drum Comes a Thundering Beat. . .

Title: From the Drum Comes a Thundering Beat. . .

Composer: Kelly-Marie Murphy (1964–)

Last time performed by the Rhode Island Philharmonic: this is a RI Philharmonic Orchestra premiere.

Orchestration: The piece is scored for two each of flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, piano, timpani, percussion and strings.

The Story: 

We seem to be living in an age of the emerging woman composer. In the United States, the trend made its first deep mark in 1983, when Ellen Taaffe Zwilich won the Pulitzer Prize for Music: the first woman to do so. Just a quick look over the list of recipients of the Pulitzer Prize for Music since then reveals the names of five more women composers:

  • 1991: Shulamit Ran
  • 1999: Melinda Wagner
  • 2010: Jennifer Higdon
  • 2013: Caroline Shaw
  • 2015: Julia Wolfe
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Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. Photo by Andrew Sacks.

 

Internationally, the list of women composers who have won major awards would be much too long to publish here. Prominently, among the youngest of these, would be Kelly-Marie Murphy.

From the Drum Comes a Thundering Beat. . . (1995) was Murphy’s first orchestral work, and with it she made her mark by winning a prize in the International Rostrum of Composers in Paris in 1996. Her official list of prizes currently totals 19 (1992-2018). Murphy is a well-educated (Ph.D. from University of Leeds, England) experienced composer, who spent some years working in the Washington, D.C., area. She now makes her home in Canada.

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Kelly-Marie Murphy. Photo by Alan Dean Photography.

 

Normally, this is the place where the program annotator tries to describe the piece, to guide the audience as they listen to it, probably for the first time. Instead, here is the revealing review by Canadian music critic Peter Goddard, The Toronto Star, from June, 1998:

“. . . Take for instance Murphy’s From the Drum Comes a Thundering Beat. . . , a 1996 [sic] CBC commission for the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and an enormously savvy work. At 13 minutes long, it’s just the right length for a mainstream, Beethoven-friendly audience to accept. And what’s really radical about it isn’t the modern-sounding bits-the clashes coming from edgy orchestral chords rushing headlong into a timpani and drum fusillade-but the five soloist sections where you could hear the subtlety of thought behind the piece.”

Program Notes by Dr. Michael Fink © 2019 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

To purchase tickets visit tickets.riphil.org or call 401.248.7000

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MEET THE Conductor: Tania Miller: Romeo & Juliet, February 14 & 15, 2020

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Amica Rush Hour Concert Series: February 14, 2020 at 6:30 p.m. at The VETS, Providence

TACO Classical Concert Series: February 15, 2020 at 8 p.m. at The VETS, Providence

Background:  Canadian Conductor Tania Miller has distinguished herself as a dynamic interpreter, musician and innovator on the podium and off. She was the driving force behind new growth, innovation and quality for the Victoria Symphony, and gained a national reputation as a highly effective advocate and communicator for the arts. As curator, she distinguished herself as a visionary leader and innovator. Acknowledged for the impact and success of her tenure, she was recently bestowed with the title Music Director Emerita of the Victoria Symphony.

Highlights:

  • Recipient of the 2017 Friends of Canadian Music award from the Canadian League of Composers
  • Received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Royal Roads University in recognition of her exemplary work as a leader and for her extraordinary artistic achievements in the community.
  • Recipient of the 2016 Paul Harris Award from the Rotary Foundation for distinguished musical excellence and leadership.
  • Canada’s Royal Conservatory of Music bestowed her with an Honorary Diploma in 2015 for her impact on music in Canada.

Critical Praise:

Review of Tania Miller’s last appearance with the RI Philharmonic, November 16, 2019

Review: Tania Miller commands R.I. Philharmonic with Shostakovich

by: Channing Gray, Special to The Journal

PROVIDENCE — Bramwell Tovey, the Rhode Island Philharmonic’s new conductor, had to skip Saturday night’s concert at Veterans Memorial Auditorium to undergo cancer treatment. But the orchestra ended up getting the next best thing: Tania Miller, a young Canadian conductor whose recent visits here have proved her to be an exciting musician and a perfect fit for the Philharmonic.

Her take on Shostakovich’s brooding Tenth Symphony, which closed out an evening of lesser-known selections, never failed to keep the big picture in view. The loneliness, the darkness of the vast opening movement, and the searing portrait of Soviet strongman Josef Stalin in the second were an emotional tsunami.

Shostakovich, who faced constant Soviet censorship, had not written a symphony since the end of World War II. But in 1953, just months after the death of Stalin, he sat down to pen the Tenth.

Miller, who stepped in for Tovey on two weeks’ notice, seemed so petite on the podium, but she took hold of the epic score and led the audience on a journey they won’t soon forget.

But the breaking news of the night was the appearance of pianist Anne-Marie McDermott, an audience favorite at the Newport Music Festival years ago. She brought with her Tchaikovsky’s rambling, episodic Second Piano Concerto, which I’ve never heard live.

Tchaikovsky actually wrote three piano concertos, but the last two have been overshadowed by the popular, and overplayed, B-Flat Minor.

There were some tender moments in the lyrical middle movement, where McDermott teamed up with concertmaster Charles Dimmick, and she brought more than a bit of glitter to the concluding section.

But try as they might, McDermott and Miller just couldn’t pull the opening movement together. It’s music in fits and starts, where every few pages the orchestra would stop and McDermott would plow through unimpressive solos cobbled together from scales and a few alternating chords.

Not inventive, imaginative music, in other words. And McDermott was unable to do much to change that with what amounted to a dutiful interpretation.

As for the obligatory encore, she tore into the Prelude from Bach’s Second English Suite, sounding quite frantic at first, but eventually relaxing and making the intricate music sing.

Miller opened the evening with another unfamiliar offering, the African American composer William Grant Still’s “In Memoriam: The Colored Soldiers Who Died for Democracy.’” The score, chosen as a Veterans Day tribute, is laced with harmonies that sound like spirituals and made a nice change of pace from tired Italian opera overtures.

To purchase tickets visit tickets.riphil.org or call 401.248.7000

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THE STORY BEHIND: Copland’s Appalachian Spring

On February 14 & 15, cellist Johannes Moser will join Tania Miller, the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra for a romantic Valentine’s Weekend program.

THE STORY BEHIND: Copland’s Appalachian Spring

Title: Appalachian Spring: Orchestral Suite

Composer: Aaron Copland (1900-1990)

Last time performed by the Rhode Island Philharmonic: February 25, 2012

Orchestration: The piece is scored for piccolo, two each of flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, trumpets and trombones, harp, piano, timpani, percussion and strings.

The Story: 

By 1943, Aaron Copland had attained a considerable reputation as a ballet composer with Billy the Kid and Rodeo to his credit. Those works had also helped to establish him as an accessible composer of what many people considered to be the sound of American music, which evokes the vast American landscape and pioneer spirit. It was natural, then, that choreographer Martha Graham should come to Copland that year with a commission from the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation and a scenario set in rural Pennsylvania of the early 19th century. Copland accepted the commission and completed the ballet the following spring.

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Aaron Copland (with Benny Goodman in background) CREDIT GEORGE BRICH / AP PHOTO

The original version of Appalachian Spring (title from a poem by Hart Crane) was scored for only 13 instruments and premiered in Washington, D.C., alongside works by Hindemith and Milhaud in October 1944. Copland’s music was an immediate success, and the following May, Graham’s company danced it in New York. In 1945, Appalachian Spring won for Copland not only the New York Music Critics Circle Award for dramatic music that season, but also the Pulitzer Prize in music.

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Martha Graham, Erick Hawkins and the Martha Graham Dance Company in Graham’s “Appalachian Spring.” Courtesy the Library of Congress.

 

Copland arranged the ballet as a continuous suite for full orchestra, which the New York Philharmonic premiered in October 1945. That version, which preserves most of the music of the original ballet, is the form in which we usually hear Appalachian Spring today. According to notes by Copland himself, there are eight distinct sections:

1. Very slowly. Introduction of the characters, one by one, in a suffused light.

2. Fast. Sudden burst of unison strings . . . starts the action.

3. Moderate. Duo for the Bride and her Intended—scene of tenderness and passion.

4. Quite fast. The revivalist and his flock. Folksy feelings—suggestions of square dances and country fiddlers.

5. Still faster. Solo dance of the Bride—presentiment of motherhood. Extremes of joy and fear and wonder.

6. Very slowly (as at first). Transition scenes reminiscent of the introduction.

7. Calm and flowing. Scenes of daily activity for the Bride and her Farmer- husband. There are five variations on a Shaker theme. The theme, sung by a solo clarinet, is called “Simple Gifts.”

8. Moderate. Coda. The Bride takes her place among her neighbors. . . . Muted strings intone a hushed, prayer-like passage. . . . The close is reminiscent of the opening music.

Program Notes by Dr. Michael Fink © 2019 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

To purchase tickets visit tickets.riphil.org or call 401.248.7000

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