The Stories Behind the Music for the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Concert Conducted by Jacomo Bairos, April 7

About the concert for the RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s TACO Classical with conductor Jacomo Bairos and soloist Alexi Kenney, Sat. April 7
Open Rehearsal is on Friday, April 6
 

 ***At A Glance ***
Romeo & Juliet
TACO Classic Concert
Saturday, April 7, 8:00pm
The VETS, One Avenue of the Arts, Providence

Jacomo Bairos, guest conductor
Alexi Kenney, violin

ROGERSON: Luminosity
PROKOFIEV: Romeo and Juliet, Suite Nos.1 & 2
KORNGOLD: Violin Concerto
MARQUEZ: Danzón No.2

Stories behind the music

Chris Rogerson 8x10c 1959

CHRIS ROGERSON (photo credit: Christian Steiner)

Chris Rogerson
Luminosity

A refreshing talent: Chris Rogerson (1988-) has been hailed by The New York Times as a “confident new musical voice,” and by the Washington Post as a “fully-grown composing talent.” Indeed, from a distinguished musical education at the Curtis Institute of Music, Yale School of Music and Princeton University, Rogerson, in 2012, has been honored with the Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He has won numerous awards including the Aaron Copland Award.

Backstory: Luminosity was commissioned by the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. It has been performed by the Atlanta and Grand Rapids symphony orchestras and the Bach Festival Orchestra.

Listen for this: A sprightly four minutes, Rogerson’s work unleashes daring virtuosity with remarkable orchestral colors. He employs modest forces but maximizes the orchestra’s sound palette through unique uses of percussion, accompaniment figures and dynamic contrasts.

Sergei Prokofiev
Romeo and Juliet: Suite Nos.1 & 2

A rocky launch: In 1934, the Kirov Theater in Leningrad suggested to Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) that he compose a full-length ballet to Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The confused and frustrating history of this great ballet started right then. As it turned out, the Kirov company backed out of its arrangement with the composer, and he signed a contract with Moscow’s Bolshoi Ballet. However, after hearing the first version of the music to Romeo and Juliet, the Bolshoi declared it “undanceable” and nullified its agreement with Prokofiev.

At that point, Prokofiev decided to salvage what music he could and set about extracting the two Romeo and Juliet suites, which premiered in 1936 and 1937. Eventually, the complete ballet was produced in 1938—but in Brno, Czechoslovakia, not in Russia. Two seasons later, the Kirov Theater presented the Russian premiere.

Sequence still works: The movements of Romeo and Juliet Suites 1 and 2 are not in the order they appear in the complete ballet. However, the movements selected for this program restore some semblance of the story. The Montagues and the Capulets present a stamping main section with a contrasting middle that gently portrays Juliet.

Listen for this: The Minuet marks the arrival of guests for the ballroom scene. The Madrigal is a dialogue between the two lovers, as is the famous nocturnal balcony scene of the Romeo and Juliet movement. Dance of the Girls with Lilies is performed by instruments softly muted so as not to wake the sleeping Juliet.

Erich Wolfgang Korngold
Violin Concerto in D Major, Op.35

Not just a Hollywood composer: Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897-1957) is well-known to classic movie buffs as the composer of scores to such adventure films as Captain Blood, The Adventures of Robin Hood and The Sea Hawk. At one time, Korngold held an honored position in European opera and concert music and was considered a wunderkind. He composed his first major work, the pantomime ballet Der Schneemann, at the age of 11 and went on to write a series of successful operas, culminating in Die tote Stadt, completed when he was only 23. Korngold got involved in Hollywood film scoring in 1934, and for a film version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, he adapted the music of Mendelssohn. He went on to compose a string of 18 original film scores—most of them swashbucklers.

Returning to his roots: His scores for films were closely aligned with the Viennese operatic stage from which Korngold had come, and his late Romantic, Wagner-cum-Straussian style fit them perfectly. Ten years before his death, Korngold abandoned film, when he discovered that his reputation in that field had damaged his image among American concert-music critics. With focused energy, he plunged into serious composition, producing over the next few years the Violin Concerto in D Major (1947), a symphony (1950) and several other works.

Listen for this:  In the first movement, notice the frequent changes of tempo, texture and mood—as in an emotional movie scene. Near the end of the movement, when the violin soloist has finished playing the unaccompanied section (called the cadenza), the first theme takes on the magnificent character of a classic movie’s “big theme.”

The finale is a jig, showing off the composer’s full range of brilliance in composing for the orchestra. Are you reminded of main title music at the opening of a classic film—particularly when the horns take up the principal theme? After the violin soloist chews up this theme by reworking it extensively, does the full-orchestra ending seem like the concerto is the sound track for rolling the end titles?

Arturo Márquez
Danzón No.2

Celebrated composer: Arturo Márquez (1950- ) was born in Alamos Sonora, Mexico. Beginning his musical training at the age of 16, he later attended Mexico City’s Conservatory of Music and the Institute of Fine Arts of Mexico. Continuing his development as a composer, Márquez went to Paris, where he worked with Jacques Castérède. At the California Institute of the Arts, Márquez studied with Morton Subotnik and Mel Powell.

Overwhelmingly received: In 1994, the National Symphony Orchestra of Mexico performed a new work by Márquez, the Danzón No.2. The audience was so enthusiastic, it demanded an encore. Commissioned in 1994 by the Filarmónica de la UNAM in Mexico City, Danzón No.2 has been performed many times in the United States.

Listen for this: This music is irresistible with its combination of long, elegant melodies and its spiky montuno rhythms.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (M-F 9am-4:30pm). On day of concerts, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30pm–showtime; Saturday, 4:00pm-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

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Beethoven’s chamber music and an original play by Judith Lynn Stillman featured at the RI Philharmonic Carter Center, April 29

Three RI Philharmonic Orchestra members, Pianist Stillman, Gamm’s Tony Estrella team up for a performance of Beethoven’s chamber music and more

The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School hosts Boldly Beethoven: Judith Lynn Stillman and Friends from the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra, an original “play within a concert” featuring special guest Cranston’s Tony Estrella, artistic director of the Gamm Theatre. Pianist Stillman, who lives on the East Side of Providence, and RI Philharmonic Orchestra members violinist Katherine Winterstein, cellist Steven Laven and clarinetist Ian Greitzer, will perform Beethoven’s Sonata No.5 for Violin and Piano (Spring), Trio for Piano, Clarinet, Cello and Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano (Kakadu Variations). Estrella, of Cranston, will bring Beethoven’s words to life in the world premiere of Stillman’s multimedia Beethoven: Torment & Triumph.

The event takes place at 2:00pm, April 29 (Sunday), at the RI Philharmonic Music School’s Carter Center, 667 Waterman Ave., East Providence. The preview is on April 26 (Thursday) at 1:00pm at Sapinsley Hall, Rhode Island College.

“I am thrilled to be part of this unique collaboration with such extraordinary colleagues. We’re hoping that my script, and the melding and juxtaposition of Beethoven’s music and words, will provide glimpses into the composer’s world and underscore the inseparable nature of person and artist. The intention is to illuminate and contextualize the music, twining together Beethoven’s, Franz Liszt’s and Carl Czerny’s letters, journals and reminiscences. n addition to the debut of my ‘play within a concert’—in which Tony Estrella portrays Beethoven and four of his contemporaries, some of Beethoven’s most monumental chamber music and piano works will be interpreted on stage by members of the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra. I’ll join these consummate artists as pianist.” –Judith Lynn Stillman, pianist, composer and filmmaker 

“We are always looking for ways to reach more people in more places in a unique and more intimate setting, which is not possible when we’re performing as a full orchestra. We are thrilled to be able to partner with Judith and Rhode Island College and involve principal players from the Orchestra in an exciting, creative musical program that can be housed at both RIC and the Carter Center, and can travel anywhere in the state or region.” –David Beauchesne, executive director of the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra and Music School

 ***At a Glance***

Boldly Beethoven: Judith Lynn Stillman and Friends from the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra
2:00pm, Sunday, April 29
RI Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School’s Carter Center
667 Waterman Ave.
East Providence

Judith Lynn Stillman, pianist
Tony Estrella, Ludwig van Beethoven

BEETHOVEN: Sonata No.5 for Violin and Piano (Spring)
BEETHOVEN: Trio for Piano, Clarinet and Cello
BEETHOVEN: Trio for Violin, Cello & Piano (Kakadu Variations)
BEETHOVEN: TORMENT & TRIUMPH: a play within a concert

Tickets are $25 for adults, $15 for students 18 and under or with a college ID, $10 for RI Philharmonic Music School students and family members. Tickets can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (M-F 9:00am-4:30pm). Day of concert tickets will be available at the Carter Center starting at 1:00pm.

Preview Performance
1:00pm, Thursday April 26
Sapinsley Hall
Rhode Island College
Providence
Admission is free, and tickets are available at the door.

About Judith Lynn Stillman

Judith Lynn Stillman, pianist, composer and filmmaker, who has been hailed as an “artistic visionary,” is the artist-in-residence and a professor of music at Rhode Island College. She has performed throughout the world, at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Marlboro, Tanglewood, Grand Teton Festival and at The Grammy’s celebration in honor of Rostropovich. She has appeared with Wynton Marsalis, The Beach Boys, Borromeo, Moscow, Muir, Cassatt and Lydian string quartets, in a BOSE commercial with Herbie Hancock, as visiting guest artist at major conservatories in China, Russia and the Czech Republic, as music director in Rome and Verona, Italy. Winner of 18 piano competitions, the first Pell Award in the Arts, and the Christiana Carteaux Bannister Award for Civil Service in the Arts, Stillman holds Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees from The Juilliard School. Stillman, as filmmaker, won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Music Video in the Sherman Oaks Film Festival in California, Best Multimedia Film in Views of the World International Festival in Montreal, Best Music Video in the Canadian Diversity Film Festival and Best Music Score in the Chautauqua International Film Festival in NY. Her iconic duo recording with Wynton Marsalis on SONY Classical was on the Top Ten of the Billboard charts: “Stillman and Marsalis make an impeccable duo. The playing consistently dazzles.”

 About Tony Estrella

tony estrella gamm theatre

Tony Estrella has been artistic director of The Gamm Theatre since 2002 and has produced more than 65 plays for the company. He began working with The Gamm as an actor in 1996, appeared in more than 30 productions, and directed over 20 shows. Under his leadership, The Gamm has received numerous awards, including Elliot Norton Awards for the world premiere of Paul Grellong’s Radio Free Emerson and Clifford Odets’ Awake & Sing! Estrella is on the theatre faculty at the University of Rhode Island and received a 2013 Pell Award for Excellence in the Arts. He has appeared in major films such as The Departed, Manchester by the Sea and The Company Men.

About the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Members

katherine-winterstein-headshot-spring2018Katherine Winterstein

is the concertmaster of the Vermont Symphony, the acting assistant concertmaster of the Rhode Island Philharmonic, and performs regularly with the Handel and Haydn Society, Boston Baroque and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project.

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IaGreitzer serves as principal clarinetist of the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra, the Rhode Island Philharmonic and the Boston Classical Orchestra.

 

imgoSteven Laven appears with the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra (principal cellist), the Rhode Island Philharmonic, the Handel & Haydn Society, Boston Symphony and Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra.

 

 

 

Meet Violinist Alexi Kenney; Performs Korngold’s Violin Concerto with the RI Philharmonic Orchestra, April 7

Soloist Alexi Kenney joins Guest Conductor Jacomo Bairos and the RI Philharmonic Orchestra for the TACO Classical concert, Saturday, April 7
Open Rehearsal is on Friday, April 6

“A talent to watch. …Architect’s eye for structure and space and a tone that ranges from the achingly fragile to full-bodied robustness.”—New York Times

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ALEXI KENNEY, Soloist for Korngold’s Violin Concerto.

  • Debuts included the Detroit, Columbus, California and Amarillo symphonies.
  • Had return engagements with the Santa Fe Symphony and the Las Vegas Philharmonic.
  • Appeared in a recital at Caramoor, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and Jordan Hall in Boston, and at Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival.Alexi Kenney, is the recipient of a 2016 Avery Fisher Career Grant.
  • Won at the 2013 Concert Artists Guild Competition at the age of 19, and it led to a critically acclaimed Carnegie Hall debut recital at Weill Hall.
  • Holds a Bachelor of Music from the New England Conservatory in Boston, where he is currently completing his Artist Diploma as a student of Donald Weilerstein and Miriam Fried.
  • Previous teachers include Wei He, Jenny Rudin and Natasha Fong.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (M-F 9am-4:30pm). On day of concerts, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30pm–showtime; Saturday, 4:00pm-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

Meet Guest Conductor Jacomo Bairos; Performs Rogerson, Prokofiev, Korngold and Marquez with the RI Philharmonic Orchestra, April 7

Jacomo Bairos conducts the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra
for the TACO Classical concert, Saturday, April 7
The open rehearsal is on Friday, April 6

About Jacomo Bairos
“Splendid sense of musicality” –Knoxville Mercury

BAIROS 7. BS SMILE Credit_ Southern_Land_Films_Celia-D-Luna-0025

JACOMO BAIROS, guest conductor

  • Music Director and Conductor of the Amarillo Symphony.
  • Co-founder and Artistic Director for Miami’s Nu Deco Ensemble.
  • Musical mentors include Gustav Meier, Larry Rachleff, Robert Spano ad Kurt Masur.
  • Graduate of Peabody Conservatory’s distinguished Orchestral Conducting Program and the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen.
  • An accomplished and award-winning tuba player who has given master classes and performed around the world.
  • This appearance marks his first performance with the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra.

This appearance marks his first performance
with the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (M-F 9am-4:30pm). On day of concerts, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30pm–showtime; Saturday, 4:00pm-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

Romeo and Juliet Suites with conductor Jacomo Bairos, April 7; Violinist Alexi Kenney performs Korngold’s Violin Concerto

The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra welcomes guest conductor Jacomo Bairos to The VETS stage for Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet Suite Nos.1 & 2, Rogerson’s Luminosity, Márquez’s Danzón No.2 and Korngold’s Violin Concerto, featuring soloist Alexi Kenney on violin. The TACO Classical concert is Saturday, April 7, at 8:00pm. The Open Rehearsal is on Friday, April 6, at 5:30pm.

“We are pleased to introduce conductor Jacomo Bairos and violinist Alexi Kenney to Rhode Island audiences. As the award-winning music director of the Amarillo Symphony, and co-founder of Miami’s hybrid Nu Deco Ensemble, Jacomo is known for his ability to craft compelling musical and multi-media experiences. We’re happy to welcome Jacomo and Alexi to The VETS to explore Prokofiev, Rogerson, Korngold and Marquez. We’re also thrilled to be near the end of our Music Director search season, and look forward to making an announcement in the near future.”
–David Beauchesne, Executive Director, Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School

 ***At A Glance ***
Romeo & Juliet
TACO Classic Concert
Saturday, April 7, 8:00pm
The VETS, One Avenue of the Arts, Providence

Jacomo Bairos, guest conductor
Alexi Kenney, violin

ROGERSON: Luminosity
PROKOFIEV: Romeo and Juliet, Suite Nos.1 & 2
KORNGOLD: Violin Concerto
MÁRQUEZ: Danzón No.2

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, and in person or by phone from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence (401.248.7000, M-F 9am-4:30pm). On concert days, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30pm–showtime; Saturday, 4:00pm-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

Open Rehearsal
Friday, April 6, at 5:30pm
General Admission is $15. Tickets are available at tickets.riphil.org or 401.248.7000 (M-F 9:00am-4:30pm)

“Bairos conducts with every fiber of his being…. His delight in being on the podium is palpable.”—Chicago Sun-Times
“Genuine talent.”—Atlanta Constitution Journal
“Splendid sense of musicality.”—Knoxville Mercury

HEAD SHOT 4 credit Dave Stovall.jpg

JACOMO BAIROS

About Jacomo Bairos, guest conductor: With education and outreach as core tenets of his work, Bairos and the Amarillo Symphony have introduced Class Act, an education program. Along with routinely coaching the Amarillo Youth Orchestras and the Greater Miami Youth Symphony, Bairos leads interactive programs and concerts for SymphonyKids, Nu Deco’s Imagine Series and Carnegie Hall’s Link-Up. Jacomo Bairos, known for his energetic leadership and dynamic artistry, is the Amarillo Symphony’s 17th music director. Since 2013, under his direction, the Amarillo Symphony has grown artistically and, for the first time in decades, boasts sell-out performances. He also has established the Symphony’s first-ever Composer-in-Residence program. Along with composer Sam Hyken, Bairos co-founded Nu Deco Ensemble, an eclectic and virtuosic chamber orchestra reimagined for the 21st-century. He is currently its artistic director.

He is the former associate conductor for the Charlotte Symphony. His musical mentors include conductors Gustav Meier, Robert Spano and Kurt Masur. After participating in the 2012 Kurt Masur Conductors Seminar in New York City—where he shared the podium with Maestro Masur in concert—Bairos was awarded the prestigious Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Scholarship by the US Mendelssohn Foundation and Kurt Masur. Bairos has traveled to Germany to conduct concerts with the Leipzig Symphony Orchestra and has assisted at the Gewandhaus Orchestra. A graduate of Peabody Conservatory’s distinguished Orchestral Conducting Program and the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen (2010 and 2012), Bairos has also worked with Jorma Panula, Marin Alsop, Hugh Wolff and Larry Rachleff.

As an accomplished and award-winning tubist, Bairos has given master classes and performed with festivals and orchestras throughout the world. At age 18, he was the first tubist in the history of the Aspen Music Festival to win the festival-wide concerto competition. Bairos has performed, toured and recorded with the New York Philharmonic, and the symphony orchestras of Chicago, Cincinnati and Seattle. He has held principal positions with orchestras in America, Spain and China, and was principal tuba for the Singapore Symphony Orchestra from 2004-2007.

About Alexi Kenney

kenney

ALEXI KENNEY

“A talent to watch. …Architect’s eye for structure and space and a tone that ranges from the achingly fragile to full-bodied robustness.” New York Times

Kenney holds a Bachelor of Music from the New England Conservatory in Boston, where he is currently completing his Artist Diploma as a student of Donald Weilerstein and Miriam Fried. Previous teachers include Wei He, Jenny Rudin and Natasha Fong. Alexi Kenney is the recipient of a 2016 Avery Fisher Career Grant. His win at the 2013 Concert Artists Guild Competition at the age of 19 led to a critically acclaimed Carnegie Hall debut recital at Weill Hall. Chamber music has continued to be his focus—touring with Musicians from Marlboro, Ravinia’s Steans Institute and regularly performing at festivals including ChamberFest Cleveland, Festival Napa Valley, the Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival, the Marlboro Music Festival, Music@Menlo, Open Chamber Music at Prussia Cove (UK), Ravinia and Yellow Barn. He has collaborated with artists including Pamela Frank, Miriam Fried, Steven Isserlis, Kim Kashkashian, Gidon Kremer and Christian Tetzlaff, and is a new member of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s CMS 2 program beginning in the 2018-19 season.

About the concert: stories behind the music

Chris Rogerson
Luminosity
A refreshing talent: Chris Rogerson (1988-) has been hailed by The New York Times as a “confident new musical voice,” and by the Washington Post as a “fully-grown composing talent.” Indeed, from a distinguished musical education at the Curtis Institute of Music, Yale School of Music and Princeton University, Rogerson, in 2012, has been honored with the Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He has won numerous awards including the Aaron Copland Award.
Backstory: Luminosity was commissioned by the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. It has been performed by the Atlanta and Grand Rapids symphony orchestras and the Bach Festival Orchestra.
Listen for this: A sprightly four minutes, Rogerson’s work unleashes daring virtuosity with remarkable orchestral colors. He employs modest forces but maximizes the orchestra’s sound palette through unique uses of percussion, accompaniment figures and dynamic contrasts.

Sergei Prokofiev
Romeo and Juliet: Suite Nos.1 & 2
A rocky launch: In 1934, the Kirov Theater in Leningrad suggested to Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) that he compose a full-length ballet to Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. The confused and frustrating history of this great ballet started right then. As it turned out, the Kirov company backed out of its arrangement with the composer, and he signed a contract with Moscow’s Bolshoi Ballet. However, after hearing the first version of the music to Romeo and Juliet, the Bolshoi declared it “undanceable” and nullified its agreement with Prokofiev.

At that point, Prokofiev decided to salvage what music he could and set about extracting the two Romeo and Juliet suites, which premiered in 1936 and 1937. Eventually, the complete ballet was produced in 1938—but in Brno, Czechoslovakia, not in Russia. Two seasons later, the Kirov Theater presented the Russian premiere.

Sequence still works: The movements of Romeo and Juliet Suites 1 and 2 are not in the order they appear in the complete ballet. However, the movements selected for this program restore some semblance of the story. The Montagues and the Capulets present a stamping main section with a contrasting middle that gently portrays Juliet.
Listen for this: The Minuet marks the arrival of guests for the ballroom scene. The Madrigal is a dialogue between the two lovers, as is the famous nocturnal balcony scene of the Romeo and Juliet movement. Dance of the Girls with Lilies is performed by instruments softly muted so as not to wake the sleeping Juliet.

Erich Wolfgang Korngold
Violin Concerto in D Major, Op.35
Not just a Hollywood composer: Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897-1957) is well-known to classic movie buffs as the composer of scores to such adventure films as Captain Blood, The Adventures of Robin Hood and The Sea Hawk. At one time, Korngold held an honored position in European opera and concert music and was considered a wunderkind. He composed his first major work, the pantomime ballet Der Schneemann, at the age of 11 and went on to write a series of successful operas, culminating in Die tote Stadt, completed when he was only 23. Korngold got involved in Hollywood film scoring in 1934, and for a film version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, he adapted the music of Mendelssohn. He went on to compose a string of 18 original film scores—most of them swashbucklers.

Returning to his roots: His scores for films were closely aligned with the Viennese operatic stage from which Korngold had come, and his late Romantic, Wagner-cum-Straussian style fit them perfectly. Ten years before his death, Korngold abandoned film, when he discovered that his reputation in that field had damaged his image among American concert-music critics. With focused energy, he plunged into serious composition, producing over the next few years the Violin Concerto in D Major (1947), a symphony (1950) and several other works.
Listen for this:  In the first movement, notice the frequent changes of tempo, texture and mood—as in an emotional movie scene. Near the end of the movement, when the violin soloist has finished playing the unaccompanied section (called the cadenza), the first theme takes on the magnificent character of a classic movie’s “big theme.”

The finale is a jig, showing off the composer’s full range of brilliance in composing for the orchestra. Are you reminded of main title music at the opening of a classic film—particularly when the horns take up the principal theme? After the violin soloist chews up this theme by reworking it extensively, does the full-orchestra ending seem like the concerto is the sound track for rolling the end titles?

Arturo Márquez
Danzón No.2
Celebrated composer: Arturo Márquez (1950- ) was born in Alamos Sonora, Mexico. Beginning his musical training at the age of 16, he later attended Mexico City’s Conservatory of Music and the Institute of Fine Arts of Mexico. Continuing his development as a composer, Márquez went to Paris, where he worked with Jacques Castérède. At the California Institute of the Arts, Márquez studied with Morton Subotnik and Mel Powell.
Overwhelmingly received: In 1994, the National Symphony Orchestra of Mexico performed a new work by Márquez, the Danzón No.2. The audience was so enthusiastic, it demanded an encore. Commissioned in 1994 by the Filarmónica de la UNAM in Mexico City, Danzón No.2 has been performed many times in the United States.
Listen for this: This music is irresistible with its combination of long, elegant melodies and its spiky montuno rhythms.

RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Executive Director David Beauchesne assures radio audiences despite a nor’easter, ‘the show will go on’

 

David Beauchesne-2

David Beauchesne, Executive Director

As the third nor’easter in 10 days bears down on Rhode Island, David Beauchesne, executive director of the RI Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School, took to the airways to assure residents that the “show will go on.”

This month’s conductor, Victor Yampolsky, may have had his flight canceled but the RI Philharmonic Orchestra is doing all it can to get him here in time for his rehearsal on Wednesday.

Listen to our Executive Director as he discusses the upcoming concert on the radio.

Stay tuned for updates!

Learn more about the TACO Classical Concert on Saturday, March 17, with an Amica Rush Hour on Friday, March 16, by clicking HERE.

Victor Yampolsky first appeared with the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra in 1996, leading a program including music from Wagner’s Tannhäuser, Grieg’s Piano Concerto and Schumann’s Symphony No.3.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (M-F 9:00am-4:30pm). On day of concerts, tickets are available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30pm–showtime; Saturday, 4:00pm-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

Meet Pianist Spencer Myer; performs Bernstein with the RI Philharmonic Orchestra for the first time, March 16-17

The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra welcomes Guest Conductor Victor Yampolsky for a program featuring pianist Spencer Myer performing Bernstein‘s Symphony No.2 (Age of Anxiety).

CL 6 Spencer Myer soloist

Spencer Myer

About Pianist Spencer Myer

“Superb playing and poised, alert musicianship”
—Boston Globe
“Definitely a man to watch”—The Independent

  • Myer’s current season debuts include the Rhode Island Philharmonic, Arizona’s Flagstaff Symphony and Colorado’s Grand Junction and Longmont Symphony orchestras.
  • Had return engagements with the Duluth Superior and Southeast Iowa symphony orchestras.
  • Half of the Daurov/Myer Duo, having teamed up with the award-winning cellist Adrian Daurov in 2012.
  • Myer’s orchestral, recital and chamber music performances have been heard throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Africa and Asia.
  • 2005 recital/orchestral tour of South Africa included a performance of the five piano concerti of Beethoven with the Chamber Orchestra of South Africa, followed by return orchestra and recital tours in 2008, 2010, 2012 and 2015.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (M-F 9:00am-4:30pm). On day of concerts, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30pm–showtime; Saturday, 4:00pm-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.