‘HARRY POTTER 2’ TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE: Providence Performing Arts Center Announces Film-Concert Series with ‘Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets™’ and the RI Philharmonic Orchestra, Feb. 16

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Audiences experience the second chapter of the Harry Potter Film Concert Series with the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra performing John Williams’ film score live to picture

Sat., February 16, 2 p.m., at the Providence Performing Arts Center

 Tickets available at PPACRI.org

The Harry Potter Film Concert Series returns to The Providence Performing Arts Center (Sat., Feb. 16, 2 p.m.) with Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets in Concert, the second film in the Harry Potter series. The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra will perform John Williams’ unforgettable score live from Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets while the entire film plays in high-definition on a 40-foot screen.

CineConcerts and Warner Bros. Consumer Products announced the Harry Potter Film Concert Series, a new global concert tour celebrating the Harry Potter films, in 2016.  Since the world premiere of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in Concert in June 2016, more than half a million fans have enjoyed this magical experience from J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World, which is scheduled to include over six-hundred performances across more than 38 countries worldwide through 2018.

Buy Tickets

Tickets for the second chapter of the Harry Potter Film Concert Series with the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra on Saturday, February 16, 2019, 2 p.m., at PPAC are available via PPACRI.org, (401)421-ARTS (2787) or at the Providence Performing Arts Center Box Office, 220 Weybosset Street, Providence, RI 02903. 

In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, cars fly, trees fight back and a mysterious house-elf comes to warn Harry Potter at the start of his second year at Hogwarts. Adventure and danger await when bloody writing on a wall announces: The Chamber of Secrets has been opened. To save Hogwarts will require all of Harry, Ron and Hermione’s magical abilities and courage. Earning a Grammy nomination for the score, the incredible music composed by John Williams became an instant classic, conjuring beautiful and soaring motifs continuing the adventures of Harry Potter on his magical journey.

Justin Freer, President of CineConcerts and Producer/Conductor of the Harry Potter Film Concert Series explains, “The Harry Potter film series is a once-in-a-lifetime cultural phenomenon that continues to delight millions of fans around the world. It is with great pleasure that we bring fans for the first time ever an opportunity to experience the award-winning music scores played live by a symphony orchestra, all while the beloved film is simultaneously projected onto the big screen. This is truly an unforgettable event.”

Brady Beaubien of CineConcerts and Concert Producer for the Harry Potter Film Concert Series added, “Harry Potter is synonymous with excitement around the world and we hope that by performing this incredible music with the full movie, audiences will enjoy returning to the Wizarding World.”

For more information on the Harry Potter Film Concert Series,  visit www.harrypotterinconcert.com.

THE PROVIDENCE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER is celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the Loew’s Theatre Building throughout its EPIC 2018/2019 Season. It was a momentous day when the Loew’s Theatre Building, now known as the Providence Performing Arts Center, opened on October 6, 1928. The Theatre, designed by Rapp & Rapp, has always been a visual marvel, and has astounded visitors with its beauty and grandeur. For nine decades, the Loew’s Theatre Building has not only survived, but ultimately flourished, while undergoing various name changes, storm damage, and ongoing architectural restoration. The Providence Performing Arts Center presents a full roster of touring Broadway theatricals and contemporary engagements. PPAC has been the theatre of choice in launching eighteen National Tours, including MISS SAIGON, CATS, and THE BAND’S VIST this Season. PPAC is a 3100-seat, world class venue located in the heart of Providence’s arts and entertainment district; it is the second largest theatre of its kind in the country.  PPAC is listed on the National Register of Historic Places; it has also been ranked by Pollstar as one of the Top Venues in the world.

RHODE ISLAND PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA & MUSIC SCHOOL is the only professional orchestra in the country to designate officially music education and performance as equal priorities. The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra’s 74th season kicked off on Sept. 22 with a new artistic leader and conductor, Bramwell Tovey. The Orchestra offers a variety of conductors, soloists and repertoire. In addition to a Summer Pops series, the Orchestra features eight Saturday classical concerts and four Friday Rush Hour concerts at The VETS, One Avenue of the Arts in Providence. The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School is committed to engaging the people of Southern New England as lifelong music listeners, teachers, learners, creators and performers.

CineConcerts is one of the leading producers of live music experiences performed with visual media. Founded by producer/conductor Justin Freer and producer/writer Brady Beaubien, CineConcerts has engaged millions of people worldwide in concert presentations that redefine the evolution of live experience. Recent and current live concert experiences include Gladiator, The Godfather, It’s a Wonderful Life, DreamWorks Animation In Concert, Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage 50th Anniversary Concert Tour, Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Rudy in Concert.

Justin Freer has quickly become one of the most sought-after conductors of film music with a long list of full symphonic live to projection projects.  He has appeared with some of the world’s leading orchestras including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony and Sydney Symphony Orchestra. From full-length movie screenings with live orchestra to music-interactive sporting event experiences to original 3D-environment holiday programming, CineConcerts is at the forefront of live entertainment.

WARNER BROS. CONSUMER PRODUCTS (WBCP), a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company, extends the Studio’s powerful portfolio of entertainment brands and franchises into the lives of fans around the world.  WBCP partners with best-in-class licensees globally on an award-winning range of toys, fashion, home décor, and publishing inspired by franchises and properties such as DC, J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World, Looney Tunes and Hanna-Barbera. The division’s successful global themed entertainment business includes groundbreaking experiences such as The Wizarding World of Harry Potter and Warner Bros. World Abu Dhabi (opening 2018). With innovative global licensing and merchandising programs, retail initiatives, promotional partnerships and themed experiences, WBCP is one of the leading licensing and retail merchandising organizations in the world.

 

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Bramwell Tovey conducts jazz-age-inspired pairing of Gershwin and Hindemith for debut as the R.I. Philharmonic Orchestra’s new conductor, October 19-20

Bramwell Tovey conducts jazz-age-inspired pairing of Gershwin and Hindemith for debut as the R.I. Philharmonic Orchestra’s new conductor, October 19-20

Jazz pianist Aaron Diehl joins Tovey and the Orchestra on
Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm

Newly appointed Artistic Advisor and conductor Bramwell Tovey joins the RI Philharmonic Orchestra and pianist Aaron Diehl for an evening of Gershwin and Hindemith. The program explores the two composers’ reaction to the jazz music of the 1930s. Tovey did not select the program—he will spearhead the orchestra’s programming beginning in 2019-20—but he is excited to put his own stamp on it. He will be joined by jazz virtuoso Aaron Diehl, on piano. By sheer coincidence, the two performed Rhapsody in Blue together with the L.A. Philharmonic just weeks ago at the Hollywood Bowl.

The concert includes Gershwin’s Cuban Overture Hindemith’s Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber, as well as Gershwin’s iconic Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations with Diehl on piano. The TACO Classical Concert is on Saturday, October 20, 8 p.m. The Amica Rush Hour Concert is on Friday, October 19, 6:30 p.m.

“This concert explores the influence of jazz on American-based composers of classical music in the 1930s and 40s, as demonstrated by Hindemith and Gershwin–two respected contemporaries who incorporated jazz into their music with wildly different results. Tovey is a master of presenting Hindemith as well as Gershwin and is an exceptional jazz and classical pianist in his own right. We are fortunate he was able to take on this program and having Aaron Diehl as the pianist makes it even more special. I expect they’ll both have a surprise or two for us. Maestro Tovey is excited about beginning to connect with our Orchestra and audience in his new role, and the Orchestra members are very much looking forward to their first concert with him since his appointment.”

David Beauchesne, Executive Director
R.I. Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School

***At a Glance***

Rhapsody in Blue
TACO Classical Concert
Saturday, October 20, 8 p.m.
The VETS

Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor
Aaron Diehl, piano
GERSHWIN: Cuban Overture, Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations
HINDEMITH: Kammermusik No.1 and Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

Rhapsody in Blue
Amica Rush Hour concert
Friday, October 19, 6:30 p.m.
The VETS

Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor
GERSHWIN: Cuban Overture, Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations
HINDEMITH: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

***
About Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor

“Leonard Bernstein called him a hero, John Adams sang his praises, and the accolades continue to pile up.…A conductor and composer renowned not just for his musical brilliance but also his great rapport with audiences, Tovey is a fierce cultural advocate and finessed cultural ambassador.”

Toronto Globe and Mail

Grammy- and Juno-award winning conductor and composer Bramwell Tovey is the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School’s Artistic Advisor; Principal Conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra; and Director of Orchestra and Conducting Studies at Boston University’s School of Music.

Following an exceptional 18-year tenure as Music Director of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, Tovey is now the orchestra’s Music Director Emeritus. Under his leadership, the VSO toured China, Asia, Canada and the United States. His innovations included the establishment of the VSO School of Music, an annual festival of contemporary music and the VSO Orchestral Institute, a summer orchestral training program for young musicians held in Whistler, British Columbia.

During 2018-19, his guest appearances include the Chicago, St. Louis, Houston, Indianapolis and Toronto symphonies and a special Christmas program with the Philadelphia Orchestra. In January, he will return to the Winnipeg Symphony’s New Music Festival, which he initiated while Music Director there.

Tovey won a 2003 Juno Award for Best Classical Composition for his choral and brass work Requiem for a Charred Skull and a 2007 Grammy for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra for a VSO recording of violin concertos by Barber, Korngold and Walton with violinist James Ehnes. His 2017 song cycle, Ancestral Voices written for acclaimed Kwagiulth mezzo-soprano Marion Newman addresses the issue of Reconciliation. His trumpet concerto, Songs of the Paradise Saloon, was commissioned by the Toronto Symphony and performed in 2014 by Alison Balsom with the LA Philharmonic, the Philadelphia and the London Philharmonic orchestras. A recording of his opera, The Inventor, commissioned by Calgary Opera, features the original cast and the VSO. His Concerto for Orchestra to commemorate the VSO’s centenary, and a new violin concerto for James Ehnes commissioned by the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Ottawa, will both receive their world premieres in spring 2019.

In 2013, Tovey was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada for services to music. Since 2006, he has been artistic director of the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain. In 2013, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada for services to music. Since 2006, he has been artistic director of the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain.

About Aaron Diehl, pianist

Aaron Diehl is one of the most sought-after jazz virtuosos, consistently playing with what the New York Times described as “melodic precision, harmonic erudition and elegant restraint.” Recent performance highlights include serving as music director for the Jazz at Lincoln Center New Orleans Songbook concert series, appearing in the New York premiere of Etudes by Philip Glass at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, collaborating with the Spanish flamenco guitarist Dani De Morón in Flamenco Meets Jazz (produced by Savannah Music Festival and Flamenco Festival) and touring the United States and Europe with Grammy-nominated jazz singer Cécile McLorin Salvant.

Ms. Salvant and the Aaron Diehl Trio, which features Mr. Diehl, bassist Paul Sikivie and drummer Lawrence Leathers, have performed at Walt Disney Hall, Jazz in Marciac, Newport Jazz Festival, North Sea Jazz Festival, Istanbul Jazz Festival, Ronnie Scott’s and La Cigale. His second album on Mack Avenue Records, called Space, Time, Continuum, emphasizes the artistic collaborations among generations. The album includes performances by NEA Jazz master Benny Golson on tenor saxophone and Duke Ellington Orchestra alumnus Joe Temperley, a baritone saxophonist. He is a graduate of the Juilliard School, where he studied with Kenny Barron, Eric Reed and Oxana Yablonskaya.

About the concert: stories behind the music

GEORGE GERSHWIN (1898-1937)

Gershwin: Cuban Overture
Vacation discovery
: In early 1932, George Gershwin spent a short holiday in Cuba. While there, he heard a great deal of native music. Rhumba bands even serenaded him under his hotel window. The trip gave him a new idea for a symphonic composition based on Cuban dance rhythms (notably the rhumba) and employing native percussion instruments.
Listen for this: Composed as a four-section form, the first section is rhythmically charged and festive. The second is slower and seductive. In the third, the theme integrates a Spanish scale with Gershwin’s characteristic “blue” notes. (We might think of this as “an American in Cuba” theme.) In the closing section, the opening material returns to propel the overture to a bustling climax.

Rhapsody in Blue
Persuaded to compose: Toward the end of 1923, fashionable band leader Paul Whiteman told Gershwin of his plans to mount a concert of jazz and jazz-inspired music early the next year. At the time, Gershwin may have casually mentioned an interest in composing a piece for piano and orchestra, but he was busy completing the score to the musical Sweet Little Devil and gave the matter no further thought for the moment. So, it came as a surprise when the New York Herald Tribune on January 4, 1924, announced that the Whiteman concert (now scheduled for February 12) would include a “jazz concerto” by Gershwin. Gershwin called Whiteman, who succeeded in convincing the composer to commit himself to the concert.
Listen for this: The immediate and lasting popularity of Rhapsody in Blue was nothing less than phenomenal. Two years after its premiere, Gershwin reworked the score for symphony orchestra. That is the version we hear today. The audience raved and so did most of the critics:

. . . It [the music] also revealed a genuine melodic gift and a piquant and individual harmonic sense to lend significance to its rhythmic ingenuity. . . . Mr. Gershwin will bear watching; he may yet bring jazz out of the kitchen.

Deems Taylor

Variations on I Got Rhythm
Holiday creation
: Gershwin’s piano variations on the famous song were composed mostly during a winter vacation in Florida in 1933. Ostensibly, this was also a trip to the South to collect local color to inspire the composer to begin composing Porgy and Bess. He spent three weeks at work on the Variations in Palm Beach, returning to New York early in January. There he quickly orchestrated his new piece in time for an all-Gershwin tour beginning in mid-February. The finishing touch was the dedication, “To my brother Ira.”
Listen for this: When Gershwin later performed the Variations on the radio, he gave his listeners this brief but inimitable description of it:

After the introduction by the orchestra, the piano plays the theme rather simply. The first variation is a very complicated rhythmic pattern played by the piano while the orchestra takes the theme. The next variation is in waltz time. The third is a Chinese variation in which I imitate Chinese flutes played out of tune, as they always are. Next the piano plays the rhythmic variation in which the left hand plays the melody upside down and the right hand plays it straight, on the theory that you shouldn’t let one hand know what the other is doing. Then comes the finale.

PAUL HINDEMITH (1895-1963)

Hindemith Kammermusik No.1 (Op. 24, No.1)
Youthful composer: Most of us are accustomed to the style of Paul Hindemith’s most familiar compositions of the 1930s-1950s. Among the most important music of this period was Hindemith’s series of three Kammermusik (chamber music) works for chamber orchestra. The first of these was composed in 1922. Its four relatively short contrasting movements give us important insight into the young, developing composer. Listen for this: The rapid background music at times becomes more important than the melodies. In fact, sometimes (especially when the piano is featured) melodies are nearly indistinguishable. Hammered percussion captures our attention much of the time until a solo trumpet brings the work to a rather crazy close.

Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber
Well known: In 1940, the year Hindemith settled in the United States, he began work on a group of sketches for a ballet that Léonide Massine was to have choreographed. However, choreographer and composer had a falling out, and Hindemith pulled out of the project. Three years later, the composer formed his sketches into the Symphonic Metamorphosis. The new work, which became one of Hindemith’s most popular orchestral works, was premiered in January 1944 by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, receiving immediate critical acclaim. In his review, Olin Downes proclaimed Hindemith’s piece to be “one of the most entertaining scores that he has thus far given us, a real jeu d’esprit by a great master of his medium in a singularly happy mood.”
Listen for this: The rakish Allegro, with which the work opens, features the large woodwind section by pitting it against the brass or strings. A Turandot Scherzo movement follows. The theme for this came from a Weber overture, but its chinoiserie betrays its Asian origin sifted through an 18th-century transcription, where Weber discovered it. Eight variations lead to a climax, but Hindemith cannot resist adding a fugue—at first for brass, then woodwinds, then percussion, and finally full orchestra.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the R.I. Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., closed Columbus Day, Monday, Oct. 8). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

The Stories Behind the Music for the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Concert Conducted by Anu Tali, Sept. 22

About the concert for the RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s TACO Classical with conductor Anu Tali and violinist Jennifer Koh, Saturday, Sept. 22
Open Rehearsal is on Friday, Sept. 21

***At a Glance ***

Pictures at an Exhibition
TACO Classical Concert
Saturday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m.
The VETS, One Avenue of the Arts, Providence
Anu Tali, guest conductor
Jennifer Koh, violin

BACH/STOKOWSKI: Toccata and Fugue in D Minor
TORKE: Bright Blue Music
MUSSORGSKY/RAVEL: Pictures at an Exhibition
GLASS: Violin Concerto No.1 

Open Rehearsal
Friday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m.

Buy Tickets
tickets.riphil.org

Stories behind the music

J.S. Bach (1685–1750)/Leopold Stokowski (1882-1977)
Toccata and Fugue in D Minor
Audacious performances: To music lovers of the first 50 years of this century, Leopold Stokowski was a household name. The English-born conductor had, quite simply, revolutionized concert life in the United States. During his tenure as conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra (1912-1938), he developed the “Philadelphia sound” and introduced audiences to an adventurous repertory.
Innovative orchestral transcriptions: He developed masterworks from other repertories, most notably J.S. Bach’s organ pieces, which took on novel sounds by donning orchestral clothing. This music riveted general audiences, while several influential purists scoffed at the romantic emotion of the arrangements. Yet, as one musician has put it, “What he did was to bring out, in a way that nobody else has, the essential mysticism and the romanticism of Bach, which is undeniable.”
Listen for this: The Toccata and Fugue in D Minor was one of the earliest transcriptions, first presented in 1927. It became world-famous when Stokowski conducted it in the opening scene of Walt Disney’s film Fantasia (1940), visually enhanced by stunning abstract graphics. In 1938, he had commented:

The Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is like a vast upheaval of Nature. It gives the impression of great white thunderclouds—like those that float so often over the valley of the Seine—or the towering majesty of the Himalayas. The Fugue is set in the frame of the Toccata, which comes before and after. This work is one of Bach’s supreme inspirations—the final cadence is like massive Doric columns of white marble.

Philip Glass (1937- )
Violin Concerto No.1

Eclectic approach: Music with popular touches is the hallmark of Philip Glass. Appealing equally to fans of rock, jazz and classical music, Glass is the ultimate “crossover” composer. This has been the case since 1965, when he developed a new musical vision while working on a film score with sitar player Ravi Shankar. From that point, his music focused on small ensembles of amplified flutes and saxophones, electronic organs and synthesizers. Glass’s style became associated with a new trend in American music called Minimalism.
Transformed opera: His first opera, Einstein on the Beach (1976), featured a violinist in the title role rather than a singer.
Listen for this: The middle movement begins with oscillating pulsations in the strings, morphing subtly into something new in preparation for the soloist. The violin enters with its simple melody. That melody repeats 13 times with some variants, tapering off until it ends abruptly. Most of the final movement proceeds Glass-like, growing out of new repetitive ideas. However, its last section is a series of slow, high reminiscences of the earlier movements, a most satisfying gesture to end the work.

Michael Torke (1961- )
Bright Blue Music
Interesting syntheses: Michael Torke’s music explores a unique fusion of classical idioms with jazz, rock ’n’ roll and other American popular styles. The extent to which he employs any of these varies with the work. He composed The Yellow Pages in 1984 for chamber ensemble, his first piece to refer to color. Then, in 1985, Torke came into the public eye with a series of “color” works for orchestra. The first of these was Ecstatic Orange, which was soon choreographed by Peter Martins for the New York City Ballet. The same year saw the composition of a sequel, Bright Blue Music.
In his own words: Torke wrote the following regarding Bright Blue Music:

Inspired by Wittgenstein’s idea that meaning is not in words themselves but in the grammar of words used, I conceived of a parallel in musical terms: harmonies in themselves do not contain any meaning, rather, musical meaning results only in the way harmonies are used. Harmonic language is then, in a sense, inconsequential. If the choice of harmony is arbitrary, why not then use tonic and dominant chords—the simplest, most direct, and, for me, the most pleasurable? Once this decision was made and put in the back of my mind, an unexpected freedom of expression followed. With the simplest means, my musical emotions and impulses were free to guide me. The feeling of working was exuberant; I would leave my outdoor studio, and the trees and bushes seemed to dance, and the sky seemed a bright blue.

Listen for this: Torke said, “The key of the piece, D major (from which there is no true modulation), has been the color blue for me since I was five-years-old. Bright Blue Music continues the compositional development of my past two pieces, but does so with a new-found freedom and lyricism, and a new language: tonality.”

Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881)/Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)
Pictures at an Exhibition
Fabulous pairing: It is difficult to conceive that the piano suite, Pictures at an Exhibition written in 1874 by Mussorgsky, had to wait until after the composer’s death to be published. Maurice Ravel’s brilliant orchestration, which immediately became part of the standard repertoire, was suggested by Serge Koussevitzky, then a popular conductor in Paris. Ravel took the suggestion and made what many consider the most exemplary orchestration of a piano work ever. Koussevitzky premiered the piece in 1923.
An expression of sorrow: The origin of Pictures at an Exhibition goes back to 1873. That year saw the death of Victor Hartmann, architect and artist, who was a close friend of Mussorgsky’s. The composer expressed his sorrow at the loss to Russian critic Vladimir Stassov, who had first introduced them. The following year Stassov helped to arrange an exhibition of 400 of Hartmann’s watercolors and drawings in St. Petersburg.
Listen for this: From the collection, Mussorgsky chose 11 works on which to build his suite, introducing some of the movements with a recurring “promenade” theme. The Promenade, as explained by Stassov, represents the composer “walking now right, now left, now as an idle person, now urged to go near a picture; at times his joyous appearance is dampened as he thinks in sadness of his departed friend. . . .” Toward the end of the section, Mussorgsky suggests the witch flying. When she lands, it is squarely on the downbeat of the final section: The Great Gate of Kiev. This was Hartmann’s design for an ancient-style gate, complete with decorative cupola and a triumphal procession marching through the arches (represented by the Promenade theme). The full mass of Ravel’s orchestra (including chimes) comes together here to give Pictures at an Exhibition a majestic conclusion.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

 

Meet Violinist Jennifer Koh; performs Concerto No.1 by Philip Glass in a return engagement, Sept. 22

Soloist Jennifer Koh joins Guest Conductor Anu Tali and the RI Philharmonic Orchestra for the TACO Classical concert, Saturday, Sept. 22
Open Rehearsal is on Friday, Sept. 21

JENNIFER KOH

JENNIFER KOH performs Concerto No.1 by Philip Glass in a return engagement, Sept. 22.

“One of our most thoughtful and intense musicians”—New York Times

About Jenner Koh, violinist

  • Gave a riveting performance with the RI Philharmonic Orchestra of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, captivating a record-setting audience in 2014.
  • Recognized for intense, commanding performances, delivered with dazzling virtuosity and technical assurance.
  • Dedicated to exploring a broad and eclectic repertoire, while promoting diversity and inclusivity in classical music.
  • Premiered more than 70 works written especially for her.
  • Named Musical America’s 2016 Instrumentalist of the Year.
  • Won the International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, Concert Artists Guild Competition and an Avery Fisher Career Grant.
  • Holds a bachelor’s in English literature from Oberlin College and studied at the Curtis Institute.
  • Artistic director of arco collaborative, Inc., an artist-driven nonprofit that fosters a better understanding of our world through a musical dialogue inspired by ideas and the communities around us.

***At a Glance ***

Pictures at an Exhibition
TACO Classical
Saturday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m.
The VETS, One Avenue of the Arts, Providence
Anu Tali, guest conductor
Jennifer Koh, violin

BACH/STOKOWSKI: Toccata and Fugue in D Minor
TORKE: Bright Blue Music
MUSSORGSKY/RAVEL: Pictures at an Exhibition
GLASS: Violin Concerto No.1 

Open Rehearsal
Friday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

Meet Conductor Anu Tali; conducts first 2018-19 TACO Classical concert featuring Bach/Stokowski, Torke, Mussorgsky/Ravel and Philip Glass, Sept. 22

Anu Tali conducts the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra
for the TACO Classical concert, Saturday, Sept. 22
Open Rehearsal is on Friday, Sept. 21

Anu Tali © Kaupo Kikkas (19)

ANU TALI

About Anu Tali, guest conductor
“Charismatic, brilliant, energetic”—Herald Tribune

  • One of the most intriguing conductors on the international scene.
  • Belongs to a new generation of artists who are constantly searching for fresh musical ideas.
  • Became music director for the Sarasota Orchestra in 2013.
  • Continued in her role as chief conductor of the Nordic Symphony Orchestra, which she founded in 1997 together with her twin sister Kadri Tali to develop cultural contacts between Estonia and Finland and unite musicians from around the world.
  • Born in Estonia, began her musical career as a pianist, graduating from the Tallinn Conservatory in 1991.
  • Trained as a conductor at the Estonian Academy of Music.
  • From 1998 to 2000, she studied at the St. Petersburg State Conservatory.

***At a Glance***

Pictures at an Exhibition
TACO Classical Concert
Saturday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m.
The VETS, One Avenue of the Arts, Providence
Anu Tali, guest conductor
Jennifer Koh, violin

BACH/STOKOWSKI: Toccata and Fugue in D Minor
TORKE: Bright Blue Music
MUSSORGSKY/RAVEL: Pictures at an Exhibition
GLASS: Violin Concerto No.1 

Open Rehearsal
Friday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

Bramwell Tovey named Artistic Advisor of the RI Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School Effective Immediately

Tovey Conducts Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra for the
First Time in His New Role, October 19 & 20

Grammy- and Juno-award winner and internationally acclaimed conductor, composer and pianist Bramwell Tovey joins the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School effective immediately as Artistic Advisor. Described as the model of a modern orchestral maestro, Tovey’s prolific career has earned him distinction on the stage, and in the classroom and community. He creates exceptional concert experiences, commissions and composes music for and of his community, and believes orchestras have a responsibility for providing and encouraging access to music education of the highest quality. Tovey is a true champion of connecting orchestras and the communities they serve.

These are values shared by the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School, which is the largest fully integrated professional orchestra and community music school in the United States. The Rhode Island Philharmonic plays a vital role in the region as an inclusive, artistic body dedicated to engaging and enriching the lives of all who wish to learn, practice and hear music. Last year, Tovey joined the faculty of the Boston University School of Music as Director of Orchestral and Conducting Studies, bringing him to New England and making this uniquely consummate appointment possible.

“I’m delighted to accept the position of Artistic Advisor for the Rhode Island Philharmonic. I’ve greatly enjoyed my concerts here and look forward to joining the Orchestra as it celebrates 75 years of music-making in 2019, and we commemorate the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth in 2020.

Three things caught my attention in Rhode Island. First and foremost, the devotion and commitment of the musicians led by concertmaster Charles Dimmick. Secondly, the wonderful Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School with its dedicated teachers and inspirational dynamic and thirdly, the excellent Board under Robert Naparstek, President of the Board of Directors and the administration under Executive Director David Beauchesne, one of the most creative orchestra managers in America. The model created by the R.I. Philharmonic Orchestra and the R.I. Philharmonic Music School is unique in the United States and has proved a template for success in the 21st century. I’m looking forward to this new relationship in my career as I firmly believe, as does the Philharmonic, that we thrive only if we serve the communities in which we make music.”

–Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor

Tovey succeeds Larry Rachleff, who led the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra for more than two decades. He will conduct the Amica Rush Hour concert, Friday, Oct. 19, and the TACO Classical concert, Saturday, Oct. 20, featuring Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue with piano soloist Aaron Diehl. Both concerts take place at The VETS in Providence, the Orchestra’s long-time home.

One of North America’s most prominent conductors, Tovey was appointed Music Director Emeritus of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra (VSO) following his 18-year tenure as its Music Director. Under his direction, the VSO toured Asia, Canada and the United States. In 2007, he won the Grammy for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra for a VSO recording of violin concertos by Barber, Korngold and Walton with violinist James Ehnes. In 2003, Tovey won the Juno Award for Best Classical Composition for his choral and brass work Requiem for a Charred Skull. He conceived and championed the VSO’s School of Music, which opened in 2011 with Tovey in the role of Artistic Advisor. The VSO School has grown rapidly, increasing the orchestra’s investment in education and its engagement with the community.

“We are thrilled and excited to welcome an artist of Tovey’s stature with impressive global renown and achievements in orchestral performance and music education. He is a true and multifaceted artist—a brilliant conductor, composer and soloist—with unique experience in the creation of a community music school connected to an orchestra. He is a progressive thinker, and the perfect person to build on Larry Rachleff’s legacy and shepherd our orchestra, school and community to new heights.”

–David Beauchesne, Executive Director

Since 2016, Tovey has conducted the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra on two successful occasions and has spent time working with students from the Music School. In November 2017, he led the Orchestra in a program that included Elgar’s “Enigma” Variations, Brahms’s Piano Concerto No.1 and Berlioz’s Le Corsaire Overture.

“I feel incredibly fortunate to be welcoming Maestro Tovey to the Rhode Island Philharmonic. He brings extraordinary musical depth and experience to our organization and is certain to be an inspirational leader for orchestra and audiences alike. The selection of such an esteemed and profound musician exemplifies the Philharmonic’s continued commitment to excellence in music-making. It is with great pride in our orchestra and the selection process that I welcome him to the podium.”

–Charles Dimmick, concertmaster and search committee member

“Members of the Orchestra, faculty, management, staff and Board are excited about the potential for growth in the quality and impact of the orchestra and our education programs under the artistic leadership of Bramwell Tovey. We are all delighted that we’ve attracted a transformational leader to join our team.”

–Marie Langlois, search committee chair and immediate past Board president

Acclaim for Bramwell Tovey

“Tovey caught fire in a wonderful rendition of Elgar’s popular Enigma Variations. The playing had passion, breadth and just seemed to blossom at every turn. The cellos sounded lush and centered, and the way Tovey…pulled the opening bars of the gorgeous ‘Nimrod’ variation out of the mist was hair-raising.” —Providence Journal

“Leonard Bernstein called him a hero, John Adams sang his praises, and the accolades continue to pile up.…A conductor and composer renowned not just for his musical brilliance but also his great rapport with audiences, Tovey is a fierce cultural advocate and finessed cultural ambassador.” —Toronto Globe and Mail

“Tovey commands resplendent playing from the Boston Symphony, having conducted breathtaking performances of Brahms’s German Requiem and Act 1 of Puccini’s Tosca in recent seasons at Symphony Hall and Tanglewood….”—Boston Classical Review

“Tovey then took on a masterwork of musical humor, Richard Strauss’ Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, leading the audience by the hand through the piece at the piano from beginning to end. He is a more mischievous teacher than, say, Leonard Bernstein was but just as illuminating….”—Los Angeles Times

“I loved Tovey’s conception of the Mahler—the breadth of the plush, main melody, the transitions into the lighter sections, the sparkle of the mocking interludes. This music spends time lavishly, but it was time well spent on Saturday.” —Toronto Globe and Mail

“He is the very model of a modern orchestral maestro…. Not only is he a supremely gifted conductor and music director, a much-published composer, a pianist (classical and jazz) and a dreamer of big projects, he is also the bearer of a fantastic sense of humor.” —Montecristo Magazine

“The establishment of the VSO School of Music was a major Tovey initiative, and a positive example of tending to the long-term musical well-being of his community.” —Vancouver Sun

About Bramwell Tovey

GRAMMY- and JUNO-award winning conductor and composer Bramwell Tovey is the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School’s recently announced Artistic Advisor; Principal Conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra; and Director of Orchestra and Conducting Studies at Boston University’s School of Music.

Following an exceptional 18-year tenure as Music Director of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, which concluded in summer 2018, he now returns as the orchestra’s music director emeritus. Under his leadership, the VSO toured China, Asia, Canada and the United States. His innovations included the establishment of the VSO School of Music, the VSO’s annual festival of contemporary music and the VSO Orchestral Institute, a comprehensive summer orchestral training program for young musicians held in British Columbia.

During 2018-19, his guest appearances include the Chicago, St. Louis, Houston, Indianapolis and Toronto symphonies, and a special Christmas program with the Philadelphia Orchestra. In January, he will return to the Winnipeg Symphony’s New Music Festival, which he initiated during his tenure as Music Director there.

In 2003, Tovey won the Juno Award for Best Classical Composition for his choral and brass work Requiem for a Charred Skull. In 2007, he won the Grammy for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra for a VSO recording of violin concertos by Barber, Korngold and Walton with violinist James Ehnes. His song cycle, Ancestral Voices, which addresses the issue of Reconciliation, was written for acclaimed Kwagiulth mezzo-soprano Marion Newman and premiered in June 2017. His trumpet concerto, Songs of the Paradise Saloon, was commissioned by the Toronto Symphony for principal trumpet, Andrew McCandless, and performed in 2014 by Alison Balsom with the LA Philharmonic, the Philadelphia and the London Philharmonic orchestras. A recording of his opera, The Inventor, commissioned by Calgary Opera, features the original cast, members of UBC Opera and the VSO. His Concerto for Orchestra will receive its world premiere during spring 2019 to commemorate the VSO’s centenary, and a new violin concerto for James Ehnes has been commissioned by the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Ottawa, and will receive its premiere at the NAC in March 2019.

Tovey was the recipient of the Oskar Morawetz 2015 Award for Excellence in Music Performance. He was previously music director of Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg where he led the world premiere of Penderecki’s Eighth Symphony on the opening of the principality’s new concert hall, the Philharmonie. He won the Prix d’or of the Academie Lyrique Française for his recording of Jean Cras’s 1922 opera Polyphème with OPL.

In 2013, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada for services to music. Since 2006, he has been artistic director of the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain.