Mozart’s Magical Mystery Tour by Judith Lynn Stillman with members of the RI Philharmonic Orchestra featured at the RI Philharmonic Carter Center, 2 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 28

Three RI Philharmonic Orchestra members, Pianist Stillman, team up
  for an all-Mozart Concert

The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School hosts Mozart’s Magical Mystery Tour: Judith Lynn Stillman and Friends from the Rhode Island Philharmonic’s Carter Center, featuring the works of Mozart. Pianist Stillman, who lives on the East Side, and RI Philharmonic Orchestra concertmaster and violinist Charles Dimmick, violist Abigail Cross and cellist Steven Laven, present a multimedia experience designed to deliver a closer look at the brilliance of Mozart and his music, in the context of his family, milieu and society.

The annual series, Judith Lynn Stillman and Friends from the Rhode Island Philharmonic’s Carter Center, currently starting its third year, kicks off on Sunday, Oct. 28, at 2 p.m., at the RI Philharmonic Music School’s Carter Center, 667 Waterman Ave., East Providence. On Monday, Oct. 29, at 1 p.m., an abridged version will be performed at Sapinsley Hall, Rhode Island College.  (The spring program in this series will be called April in Paris with Poulenc and will feature Stillman with five members of the RI Philharmonic Orchestra and Trinity Rep’s Curt Columbus.)

“We are always looking to connect with and build our audience by performing in diverse, unique and intimate settings, which is difficult to do with the full orchestra. We are thrilled to have Judith and principal players from the Orchestra create exciting musical programs that can be performed at Rhode Island College and the Carter Center and can travel anywhere.  The results to date have been remarkable!”

–David Beauchesne,
Executive Director, RI Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School

 “This unique program, with accompanying visuals, includes chamber music from duo, to trio, to quartet—and the musicians will be heard on period as well as modern instruments. Timeless in his humanity, Mozart touches our souls. His music is perfect in proportion and consummate in range of expression, from exuberance to melancholy and back again.”

–Judith Lynn Stillman

***At a Glance***

Mozart’s Magical Mystery Tour: Judith Lynn Stillman and Friends from the Rhode Island Philharmonic
2:00 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 28
RI Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School’s Carter Center
667 Waterman Ave.
East Providence

Judith Lynn Stillman, artistic director and pianist

RI Philharmonic Orchestra Friends
Charles Dimmick, violin
Abigail Cross, viola
Steven Laven, cello

Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano in B-Flat Major
Mozart: Piano Trio in C Major
Mozart:
Piano Quartet in E-Flat Major, K. 493

Buy Tickets

Tickets are $25 for adults, $15 for students 18 and under or with a college ID, $10 for RI Philharmonic Music School students and family members. Tickets can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (M-F 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., closed Columbus Day, Oct. 8). Day of concert tickets will be available at the Carter Center starting at 1 p.m.

Mozart’s Magical Mystery Tour: Judith Lynn Stillman and Friends from the Rhode Island Philharmonic, abridged version
1:00 p.m., Monday, Oct. 29
Sapinsley Hall
Rhode Island College
Providence
Admission is free with a suggested donation of $10, and tickets are available at the door.

STILLMAN

JUDITH LYNN STILLMAN

Judith Lynn Stillman, pianist, composer and filmmaker, who has been hailed as an “artistic visionary,” is the Artist-in-Residence and a Professor of Music at Rhode Island College. She has performed throughout the world, at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Marlboro, Tanglewood, Grand Teton Festival and at the Grammy’s celebration in honor of Rostropovich. She has appeared with Wynton Marsalis, Borromeo, Shanghai, Muir, Cassatt and Lydian string quartets, the Beach Boys, in a BOSE commercial with Herbie Hancock, as visiting guest artist at major conservatories in China, Russia and the Czech Republic, and as music director in Rome and Verona, Italy. Winner of 18 piano competitions, the first Pell Award in the Arts, and the Christiana Carteaux Bannister Award for Civil Service in the Arts, Stillman holds bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from The Juilliard School, where she won the Juilliard concerto competition and the Dethier Prize for Outstanding Pianist. Stillman, as filmmaker-composer-pianist, has garnered awards including Grand Jury Prize: Best Music Video, Best Multimedia Film, Best Music Score and Audience Choice in international film festivals in Los Angeles, Montréal, New York and the United Kingdom. Her iconic duo recording with Wynton Marsalis on Sony Classical was on the Top Ten of the Billboard charts: “Stillman and Marsalis make an impeccable duo. The playing consistently dazzles.”

About RI Philharmonic Orchestra members

DIMMICK (2)

CHARLES DIMMICK

Violinist Charles Dimmick is the concertmaster for the RI Philharmonic Orchestra. He has been praised by The Boston Globe for his “cool clarity of expression,” and also has been concertmaster of the Boston Modern Orchestra Project since 2006; Elliott Schwartz’s Chamber Concerto VI: Mr. Jefferson marks Mr. Dimmick’s debut performance and recording as soloist with the ensemble. In addition to his leadership role in BMOP, Mr. Dimmick is concertmaster of the Portland Symphony Orchestra. He has performed with the Boston Pops, Boston Lyric Opera, Opera Boston and

OLSON

ABIGAIL KUBERT CROSS

Born in Syracuse, NY., Violist Abigail Kubert Cross started her musical career studying Suzuki piano at age four and, at age 9, picked up the viola in the public schools. In 1993 and 1995 respectively, Cross received her bachelor’s and master’s from Boston University where she studied with Steven Ansell, principal viola of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. She spent her summers at Tanglewood, Kneisel Hall, Sarasota Music Festival, and one summer performing opera in Rome. She is currently principal viola of the Rhode Island Philharmonic, a position she has held for 21 years. In addition, she is a member of the Boston Lyric Opera Orchestra and performs regularly with the Boston Ballet, the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra, Odyssey Opera, BMOP and the Boston Landmarks Orchestra. As a member of Walt Disney World’s All-American College Orchestra Alumni, Cross performs a yearly concert in Orlando.

LAVEN

STEVEN LAVEN

Cellist Steven Laven appears with the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra (principal cellist), the Rhode Island Philharmonic, the Handel & Haydn Society, Boston Symphony and Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra. He is also an adjunct instructor of cello and chamber music at Rhode Island College, performing in the faculty Proteus String Quartet. Previously, he has held titled positions in the Houston Ballet, Houston Grand Opera and Omaha Symphony Orchestra. He has earned cello performance degrees from the Eastman and Manhattan schools of music.

 

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Two Smithfield High School students have lots to say about making music and music education

MAIA AND MAX SMILING_cropped_deited

Smithfield High School students inspired by music education: Maia Bowker, left, suggested to Max Votolato, right, that he “check out” RI Philharmonic Music School’s Youth Wind Ensemble. He  was hooked after sitting in on one rehearsal.

 

 

“I heard about RIPYWE from a family friend whose son used to be in RI Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. At the time, I had never been in a full-sectioned wind ensemble and knew that it would be a challenging but important learning experience for me. I was also very interested in being in an ensemble with students from other schools.”

–Maia Bowker, member of the RI Philharmonic Music School Wind Ensemble

Maia Bowker and Max Votolato, Smithfield natives, are members of the Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School’s Youth Wind Ensemble (RIPYWE).

Maia is a senior at Smithfield High School, and since 2016, she has been a key member of one of the R.I. Philharmonic Music School’s wind ensembles. Max, who is a senior at the same school, has been involved with one of the ensembles since 2016. A member of the Music School’s staff recently sat down with them to learn more about the role music and the school’s youth ensembles program plays in enriching their lives.

Q: Can you tell us about your musical experience? What has your experience been with RIPYWE? What does music mean to you?

MAIA: I currently play two instruments, the bassoon and trumpet. Three years ago, in my freshman year of high school, I started playing the bassoon. Six years ago, when I was in the sixth grade, I picked up the trumpet.

In my sophomore year of high school, I joined the RI Philharmonic Youth Wind Ensemble. Immediately, I found that sitting among peers who exhibit the utmost passion for music was certainly a heart-warming experience for me. It was inspiring and comforting to play with others who strive to work, grow and mature musically. I have found that this positive atmosphere creates a very strong support system among students, directors, teachers and parents.

To me, music is less of what lies on paper, and more of what resides in the heart. It must be crafted with tears, disappointment, and failure to become a sound of joy. From my own experience thus far, music can be emotionally tolling when you put yourself into it. Failures can be devastating, and successes can be wonderful. Failures can be wonderful, and successes can be devastating.

MAX: I play the saxophone, and when I was in the sixth grade about six years ago I started playing my middle school’s band. In addition, I picked up the trumpet during my freshman year. About three years ago, I started performing with the Rhode Island Philharmonic Youth Wind Ensemble (RIPYWE).

At first it was a tiny bit nerve-racking, but what is amazing is that you start improving right away. Soon, it feels great to play music at such a high level. As part of RIPWYE, every year my playing ability improves and gets so much better. My experience with the RI Philharmonic has really cemented my love of music, and my desire to pursue music as a career.

Music is my means of self-expression. I feel, it’s really the only thing I’m good at so it’s an outlet for me to express myself.

Q: What is your favorite piece of music or moment from your RIPYWE experience?

MAIA: My favorite moment from my RIPYWE experience was playing Alfred Reed’s Giligia in concert. The melody in the closing portion of the piece is somber and reflective—supported by flutes in low register. After the last chord lifted and resonated, there was such an incredibly chilling silence before the audience applauded.

MAX: There’s a lot of great pieces that we’ve done but I think my favorite was Percy Grainger’s Gum-Suckers March because he wrote some great sax parts, which as a tenor player can be rare.

Q: How has playing in an ensemble changed your relationship with music and helped you grow as a musician?

MAIA: Playing in an ensemble has helped me become comfortable with sharing my love of music with others. To play with expression and emotion in an isolated setting initially was difficult. One must allow themselves to channel their love into an audibly recognizable state. To display musical emotion in a group setting was a completely different challenge. It can be frightening to be emotionally vulnerable, especially under the critical eye of your peers. However, when playing in an ensemble where members have similar goals, passion and drive, expression is welcomed with open arms. Learning this concept has allowed me to understand that it’s okay feel nervous about playing expressively, and that doing so is encouraged and accepted.

RIPYWE has taught me to constantly crave a challenge. When I first joined RIPYWE, I had very little experience with the bassoon. To be surrounded by those who strive for self-improvement has helped me develop similar values and ambitions. This has not only helped me musically but has also been very beneficial when applied to my efforts in school.

MAX: My work with the Ensemble has made me more focused and definitely more  vigilant in my practicing—for sure. I am more confident. When doing solo material if you fail or play a wrong note, the only person you let down is yourself. In an ensemble, everyone else is relying on you to know your part and perform it to the best of your ability. You are included in a team and motivated to do the best you can.

Q: How do you see music playing a role in your life in the future?

MAIA: My music directors have impacted me and inspired me to make music with love. As someone who has discovered a lifelong passion because of these directors, I find it extremely important for me to share my love of music with others by becoming a music educator.

MAX: After my experiences with the Music School, I know now that I am going to major in music education because I want to share the feeling I get when I play with as many people as I can.

Q: How did you hear about RIPYWE? What made you want to join? What do you remember from your audition? How did you feel when you walked out the door?

MAIA: I heard about RIPYWE from a family friend whose son used to be in RI Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. At the time, I had never been in a full-sectioned wind ensemble and knew that it would be a challenging but important learning experience for me. I was also very interested in being in an ensemble with students from other schools.

I remember meeting Chelsea Anderson and Dr. Neves for the first time. Any nerves that I had were almost immediately gone because of how welcomed I felt. When I walked out the door, I was extremely excited.

MAX: Maia told me about RIPYWE, and I went and sat in on a rehearsal. I had a great time. It felt very comfortable. I auditioned the next week.

Q: Anything else you want to say?

MAIA: I want to thank Chelsea Anderson and Dr. Neves for providing me with the opportunity to play with such ambitious musicians. They have inspired me to strive for greatness, and both have a very special place in my heart. Playing in RIPYWE for the past three years has been a unique and unforgettable experience that I will miss dearly when I graduate.

About the Rhode Island Philharmonic Youth Wind Ensembles (RIPYWE)

Founded in 2002, RIPYWE offers advanced woodwind, brass and percussion students from Rhode Island and nearby Massachusetts and Connecticut an outstanding opportunity to rehearse and perform high quality wind ensemble repertoire. RIPYWE offers these students a challenging and rewarding musical experience. RIPYWE Symphonic Winds is conducted by Music Director Dr. David Neves, and RIPYWE Wind Ensemble is conducted by John Knasas Jr.

 Students interested in auditioning or learning more about our ensembles should contact: Youth Ensembles Manager Chelsea Anderson at 401-248-7038 or canderson@riphil.org.

The Stories Behind the Music for the Jazz-inspired RI Philharmonic Orchestra first concert with Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Oct. 19 and 20

About the concert for RI Philharmonic Orchestra featuring
Maestro Bramwell Tovey and Piano soloist Aaron Diehl

TACO Classical concert is on Saturday, Oct. 20, at 8 p.m. at The VETS
Amica Rush Hour concert is on Friday, Oct. 19, at 6:30 p.m. at The Vets

***At a Glance***

Rhapsody in Blue
TACO Classical Concert
Saturday, October 20, 8 p.m.
The VETS

Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor
Aaron Diehl, piano
GERSHWIN: Cuban Overture, Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations
HINDEMITH: Kammermusik No.1 and Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

Rhapsody in Blue
Amica Rush Hour concert
Friday, October 19, 6:30 p.m.
The VETS

Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor
GERSHWIN: Cuban Overture, Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations
HINDEMITH:
Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

Stories behind the music

Works by GEORGE GERSHWIN (1898—1937)
Cuban Overture

In early 1932, George Gershwin spent a short holiday in Cuba. While there, he heard a great deal of native music. Rhumba bands even serenaded him under his hotel window. The trip gave him a new idea for a symphonic composition based on Cuban dance rhythms (notably the rhumba) and employing native percussion instruments. After his return to New York, Gershwin spent about three weeks composing his new piece and another eight days orchestrating it. Under its first title, Rhumba, the work premiered as part of the world’s first all-Gershwin concert at Lewisohn Stadium on August 16, 1932. The next winter, Gershwin renamed the music with the following explanation: “When people read Rhumba they expect the ‘Peanut Vendor’ or a like piece of music. Cuban Overture gives a more just idea of the character and intent of the music.”

Cuban Overture was composed as a four-section form. The first section is rhythmically charged and festive. The second is slower and seductive. In the third, the theme integrates a Spanish scale with Gershwin’s characteristic “blue” notes. (We might think of this as “an American in Cuba” theme.) In the closing section, the opening material returns to propel the overture to a bustling climax. Gershwin’s original conductor’s score showed that in front of the podium should be positioned traditional Cuban instruments including a Cuban stick, bongos, gourd and maracas.

Rhapsody in Blue

Toward the end of 1923, fashionable band leader Paul Whiteman told Gershwin of his plans to mount a concert of jazz and jazz-inspired music early the next year. At the time, Gershwin may have casually mentioned an interest in composing a piece for piano and orchestra, but he was busy completing the score to the musical Sweet Little Devil and gave the matter no further thought for the moment. So, it came as a surprise when the New York Herald Tribune on January 4, 1924, announced that the Whiteman concert (now scheduled for February 12) would include a “jazz concerto” by Gershwin. Gershwin called Whiteman, who succeeded in convincing the composer to commit himself to the concert. The composer later stated:

“There had been so much chatter about the limitations of jazz, not to speak of the manifest misunderstandings of its function. Jazz, they said, had to be in strict time. It had to cling to dance rhythms. I resolved, if possible, to kill that misconception with one sturdy blow. Inspired by this aim, I set to work composing with unwonted rapidity.”

It was Gershwin’s brother Ira who suggested the title Rhapsody in Blue. Gershwin finished the two-piano version of the Rhapsody in about three weeks. Because of his commitment to Sweet Little Devil and the brief time before Whiteman’s concert, he turned the initial scoring job over to Ferde Grofé, Whiteman’s orchestrator. This first version was simply for a jazz band and a few strings.

Finally, the night of the concert arrived with a full house and a star-studded audience, and the event began with words:

“Mr. Whiteman intends to point out . . . the tremendous strides which have been made in popular music from the day of discordant jazz, which sprang into existence about ten years ago from nowhere in particular, to the really melodious music of today. —Hugh C. Ernst, introductory remarks to the audience

And, that historical moment, playing the Rhapsody in Blue with Gershwin at the piano:

“Somewhere in the middle of the score I began crying. When I came to myself I was 11 pages along, and until this day I cannot tell you how I conducted that far.”–Paul Whiteman

The audience raved and so did most of the critics:

“. . . It [the music] also revealed a genuine melodic gift and a piquant and individual harmonic sense to lend significance to its rhythmic ingenuity. . . . Mr. Gershwin will bear watching; he may yet bring jazz out of the kitchen.”–Deems Taylor

The immediate and lasting popularity of Rhapsody in Blue was nothing less than phenomenal. Two years after its premiere, Gershwin reworked the score for symphony orchestra. That is the version we hear today, as writers continue their choruses of critical praise:

“The Rhapsody in Blue is by no means a consistent or integrated masterwork. . . . But the basic melodic and rhythmic material is so fresh and good, and is presented with such verve and spontaneity, that the work as a whole never loses its ability to excite the listener.”–David Ewen

Variations on I Got Rhythm

The last 1920s-style, razzmatazz musical by George Gershwin and his lyricist-brother Ira was Girl Crazy (1930). Despite the show’s superficiality, it contained wonderful songs, including two great ballads: Embraceable You and But Not for Me.

Ginger Rogers starred in the show, but cast member Ethel Merman, making her Broadway debut, stole it. She introduced the world to Gershwin’s immortal song, I Got Rhythm, which became one of the composer’s personal favorites.

Gershwin’s piano variations on the famous song were composed mostly during a winter vacation in Florida in 1933. Ostensibly, this was also a trip to the South to collect local color to inspire the composer to begin composing Porgy and Bess. He spent three weeks at work on the Variations in Palm Beach, returning to New York early in January. There he quickly orchestrated his new piece in time for an all-Gershwin tour beginning in mid-February. The finishing touch was the dedication, “To my brother Ira.”

When Gershwin later performed the Variations on the radio, he gave his listeners this brief but inimitable description of it: “After the introduction by the orchestra, the piano plays the theme rather simply. The first variation is a very complicated rhythmic pattern played by the piano while the orchestra takes the theme. The next variation is in waltz time. The third is a Chinese variation in which I imitate Chinese flutes played out of tune, as they always are. Next the piano plays the rhythmic variation in which the left hand plays the melody upside down and the right hand plays it straight, on the theory that you shouldn’t let one hand know what the other is doing. Then comes the finale.”

Works by PAUL HINDEMITH (1895—1963)
Kammermusik No.1 (Op. 24, No.1)

Most of us are accustomed to the style of Paul Hindemith’s most familiar compositions of the 1930s-1950s, such as the Mathis der Maler symphony or the many sonatas for orchestral and keyboard instruments. These were the works of Hindemith’s maturity, and they follow his closely worked out theories of composition in a consistent, sometimes even predictable, manner. Yet there was once a younger, more volatile Hindemith. That was the composer who, around 1922, leaped to prominence as the most important young musician in post-war Germany. His singular personality could easily be identified in his music even then, but his music was more eclectic, spontaneous and adventurous than later. It was in a style spiced with dissonance and formal experiments, which elicited both admiration and harsh criticism.

Among the most important music of this period was his series of three Kammermusik (chamber music) works for chamber orchestra. The first of these was composed in 1922. Its four relatively short contrasting movements give us important insight into the young, developing composer. The first movement, marked “Very fast and wild,” is just that. Its relentless, frenetic repetitions and blaring tone colors might portray new-found emotions in the new age of the 1920s. The second movement is a satirical march, perhaps demonstrating the rebellious new freedom of expression of the time. Third comes a slow-moving quartet of woodwinds playing seriously and reflectively (for a welcome change). The music is expressive and reflective, but not in the manner of 19th-century Romantics. Hindemith gives us something new and original. For the last movement, the composer sardonically quotes a tune of popular music from that year. Now we are back in the wild world of the first movement. Keys change rapidly and unpredictably. The rapid background music at times becomes more important than the melodies. In fact, sometimes (especially when the piano is featured) melodies are nearly indistinguishable. Hammered percussion captures our attention much of the time until a solo trumpet brings the work to a rather crazy close.

Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

In 1940, the year Hindemith settled in the United States, he began work on a group of sketches for a ballet that Léonide Massine was to have choreographed. However, choreographer and composer had a falling out, and Hindemith pulled out of the project. Three years later, the composer formed his sketches into the Symphonic Metamorphosis. The new work, which became one of Hindemith’s most popular orchestral works, was premiered in January 1944 by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, receiving immediate critical acclaim.

In his review, Olin Downes proclaimed Hindemith’s piece to be “one of the most entertaining scores that he has thus far given us, a real jeu d’esprit by a great master of his medium in a singularly happy mood.”

The themes Hindemith chose are not well-known, nor are they necessarily among Weber’s best. However, perhaps those are good reasons for Hindemith’s broad and often humorous handling of them. All the themes come from a piano duet collection by Weber.

The rakish Allegro, with which the work opens, features the large woodwind section by pitting it against the brass or strings. A Turandot Scherzo movement follows. The theme for this came from a Weber overture, but its chinoiserie betrays its Asian origin sifted through an 18th- century transcription, where Weber discovered it. Eight variations lead to a climax, but Hindemith cannot resist adding a fugue—at first for brass, then woodwinds, then percussion, and finally full orchestra.

The simple Andantino is a tranquil siciliano with a virtuosic passage (like a Baroque double) for flute at the end. This leads to the concluding Marsch, in which Hindemith for a time is true to his model. However, before long he transforms Weber’s material in the witty spirit of the work, leading to a powerful climax at the end.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., closed Columbus Day, Monday, Oct. 8). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

 

Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School announces Season-Opener Youth Orchestra Concert, Nov. 4

800 YOUTH ORCHESTRAThe Rhode Island Philharmonic Youth Orchestras (RIPYO) presents its first concert of the season on Sunday, November 4, 1 p.m., at the Auditorium in Roberts Hall, Rhode Island College. The concert features the top-level Symphony Orchestra conducted by Music Director Alexey Shabalin, Repertory Orchestra under the direction of Vincent Mattera, and String Orchestra under the direction of Irina Naryshkova. The Symphony Orchestra will perform Bernstein’s West Side Story and other contemporary works. Repertory Orchestra and String Orchestra will perform standard classical repertoire.

**** At a Glance****

RI Philharmonic Youth Orchestras Concert
1 p.m., Sunday, November 4
Rhode Island College, Auditorium in Roberts Hall
600 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Providence

Buy Tickets

Tickets are $12 adults; $7 students, 18 and under, and senior citizens. Purchase tickets via the RIC Box Office at:
http://purchase.tickets.com/buy/TicketPurchase?orgid=21971&schedule=list
or by calling 401-456-8144, from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m., Mon – Fri.

About The Rhode Island Philharmonic Youth Ensembles: The Rhode Island Philharmonic Youth ensembles (RIPYO, RIPYWE, RIPYJazz, & Chamber) provide quality rehearsal and performance experience for talented young musicians from Rhode Island and nearby Connecticut and Massachusetts. Students range from elementary school through high school. (A full list of students and their home cities are attached.)

 For more information or to schedule an audition, visit musicschool.riphil.org or contact Youth Ensembles Manager Chelsea Anderson at 401-248-7038 or canderson@riphil.org. For more information on the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Music School, its activities and performances, visit musicschool.riphil.org.

 

Meet pianist Aaron Diehl; Performs Gershwin in a debut performance, Oct. 19 and 20

Soloist Aaron Diehl joins Artistic Advisor Tovey Bramwell
for evening of Gershwin and Hindemith

 TACO Classical Concert, Saturday, Oct. 20
Amica Rush Hour is on Friday, Oct. 19

About Aaron Diehl, pianist

“Melodic precision, harmonic erudition, and elegant restraint….Mr. Diehl play[s] magnificently.”–The New York Times

  • One of the most sought-after jazz virtuosos.
  • Performed Rhapsody in Blue this past summer with Bramwell Tovey conducting at the Hollywood Bowl.
  • Served as music director for the Jazz at Lincoln Center New Orleans Songbook concert series.
  • Appeared in the New York premiere of Etudes by Philip Glass at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, collaborating with the Spanish flamenco guitarist Dani De Morón in Flamenco Meets Jazz (produced by Savannah Music Festival and Flamenco Festival).
  • Toured the United States and Europe with Grammy-nominated jazz singer Cécile McLorin Salvant.
  • Performed at Walt Disney Hall, Jazz in Marciac, Newport Jazz Festival, North Sea Jazz Festival, Istanbul Jazz Festival, Ronnie Scott’s and La Cigale with Ms. Salvant and the Aaron Diehl Trio
  • Second album, called Space, Time, Continuum, emphasizes the artistic collaborations among generations. The album included performances by NEA Jazz master Benny Golson on tenor saxophone and Duke Ellington Orchestra alumnus Joe Temperley, a baritone saxophonist.
  • Graduated from Juilliard School, where he studied with Kenny Barron, Eric Reed and Oxana Yablonskaya.

***At a Glance***

Rhapsody in Blue
TACO Classical Concert
Saturday, October 20, 8 p.m.
The VETS

Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor
Aaron Diehl, piano
GERSHWIN: Cuban Overture, Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations
HINDEMITH: Kammermusik No.1 and Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

Rhapsody in Blue
Amica Rush Hour concert
Friday, October 19, 6:30 p.m.
The VETS

Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor
GERSHWIN: Cuban Overture, Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations
HINDEMITH: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., closed Columbus Day, Monday, Oct. 8). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.

Hasbro Inc. Raises $2,000 for RI Philharmonic Music School Scholarship Fund

IMG_0116RI Philharmonic Music School’s jazz band performed at Hasbro’s annual Showcase of Stars fundraiser, which raised funds for the Music School’s Scholarship Fund. Members of the band in the photo include:  Richard Evangelista, Providence, on the drums in the back; in front, from left to right, Eli Kelley, Barrington, Medeski Dow, Pawtucket, and Tor Kenyon Barrington. 

 Hasbro Inc. Raises $2,000 for RI Philharmonic Music School
Scholarship Fund at Rock 4 Kids Concert

Students from the Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School joined Hasbro’s Music Matters Employee Network on Saturday (Sept. 29) for Hasbro’s annual Showcase of Stars fundraiser. The night of music and giving at Machines with Magnets in Pawtucket featured performances from the RI Philharmonic Music School’s Jazz Fusion group and Hasbro’s employees who entertained the crowd with music, improv and dancing.

The benefit concert raised more than $2,000 for the Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School scholarship fund, and the proceeds will be used for local under-served students to take advantage of music education such as music lessons and perform in jazz groups, rock bands, youth orchestras and ensembles.

“We’re thrilled that our Music Matters Employee Network could play alongside the RI Philharmonic’s youth jazz band. It’s great to see how some of our incredibly talented employees helped provide such an amazing opportunity for youth to experience the RI Philharmonic’s innovative music education programs.”

–Hasbro Chairman and CEO Brian Goldner

Hasbro’s Music Matters Network is a group of employees that showcase their diverse individual and collective musical styles and talents. Their mission is to promote music education and awareness at Hasbro and in the community through volunteering and benefit concerts.

“These talented young musicians appreciate the opportunity to perform and share their music. When the students perform for a really good cause like the Student Scholarship Fund, they get to combine their love of music while giving back to the Music School community.”

–Youth Jazz Band Director Wendy Klein

In addition to Music Fundraisers, Hasbro has been a longtime supporter of the RI Philharmonic’s innovative programs that bring music education to thousands of students in Rhode Island each year. A grant from the Hasbro Children’s Fund will once again help public elementary students in Pawtucket participate in education-related concerts free of charge at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium in the spring of 2019. Called Link Up, students spend most of the school year learning to play the recorder and studying the music to perform in concert along with the RI Philharmonic Orchestra. Thousands of students from the Southern New England area participate in this educational program.

The RI Philharmonic Youth Jazz Band consists of middle and high school students on Brass, Wind and Rhythm instruments. They perform Jazz Standards, Big Band Repertoire and the music of the American Songbook.

About the Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School: The Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School encourages lifelong engagement with music through comprehensive music education and community partnership programs taught by Orchestra members and outstanding faculty. We prioritize artistry and education equally. Quality, access, diversity and collaboration are core values. The Philharmonic Music School serves students of all ages and ability levels, and provides instruction in all kinds of music, from jazz and rock to classical and folk, through private lessons, chamber music classes and large and small ensembles. More than 70 dedicated teachers comprise the faculty, many with degrees from some of the finest music schools in the world. Most of the Philharmonic Music School programs take place at the state-of-the-art Carter Center in East Providence. Completed in 2008, the Carter Center for Music Education and Performance is the largest dedicated community music school facility in New England. We also offer lessons in a welcoming, well-equipped environment at our East Greenwich branch.

 About Hasbro: Hasbro (NASDAQ: HAS) is a global play and entertainment company committed to Creating the World’s Best Play Experiences. From toys and games to television, movies, digital gaming and consumer products, Hasbro offers a variety of ways for audiences to experience its iconic brands, including NERF, MY LITTLE PONY, TRANSFORMERS, PLAY-DOH, MONOPOLY, BABY ALIVE and MAGIC: THE GATHERING, as well as premier partner brands. Through its entertainment labels, Allspark Pictures and Allspark Animation, the Company is building its brands globally through great storytelling and content on all screens. Hasbro is committed to making the world a better place for children and their families through corporate social responsibility and philanthropy. Hasbro ranked No. 5 on the 2018 100 Best Corporate Citizens list by CR Magazine and has been named one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies® by Ethisphere Institute for the past seven years. Learn more at www.hasbro.com, and follow us on Twitter (@Hasbro & @HasbroNews) and Instagram (@Hasbro).

 

 

 

 

Meet Artistic Advisor Bramwell Tovey; Conducts an unusual jazz-influenced pairing of Gershwin and Hindemith with the RI Philharmonic Orchestra, October 19-20

Bramwell Tovey conducts the RI Philharmonic Orchestra

TACO Classical Concert is Saturday, October 20, 8 p.m.
Amica Rush Hour Concert is on Friday, October 19, 6:30 p.m.

About Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor

“Leonard Bernstein called him a hero, John Adams sang his praises, and the accolades continue to pile up.…A conductor and composer renowned not just for his musical brilliance but also his great rapport with audiences, Tovey is a fierce cultural advocate and finessed cultural ambassador.” —Toronto Globe and Mail

  • Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra & Music School’s Artistic Advisor and conductor.
  • Principal Conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra.
  • Director of Orchestra and Conducting Studies at Boston University’s School of Music.
  • In 2003, winner of the Juno Award for Best Classical Composition for the choral and brass work Requiem for a Charred Skull.
  • In 2007, won the Grammy for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra for a VSO recording of violin concertos by Barber, Korngold and Walton with violinist James Ehnes.
  • 18-year tenure as music director of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra (VSO), and now the orchestra’s music director emeritus.
  • Toured China, Asia, Canada and the United States with VSO, and established the VSO School of Music.
  • Premiered in 2007 Song cycle, Ancestral Voices, which addresses the issue of Reconciliation, and was written for acclaimed Kwagiulth mezzo-soprano Marion Newman.
  • Recording of his opera, The Inventor, commissioned by Calgary Opera, features the original cast, members of UBC Opera and the VSO.
  • Recipient of the Oskar Morawetz 2015 Award for Excellence in Music Performance.
  • Won the Prix d’or of the Academie Lyrique Française for his recording of Jean Cras’s 1922 opera Polyphème with OPL.
  • In 2013, appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada for services to music. Since 2006, he has been artistic director of the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain.

***At a Glance***

Rhapsody in Blue
TACO Classical Concert
Saturday, October 20, 8 p.m.
The VETS

Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor
Aaron Diehl, piano
GERSHWIN: Cuban Overture, Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations
HINDEMITH: Kammermusik No.1 and Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

Rhapsody in Blue
Amica Rush Hour concert
Friday, October 19, 6:30 p.m.
The VETS

Maestro Bramwell Tovey, Artistic Advisor
GERSHWIN: Cuban Overture, Rhapsody in Blue and I Got Rhythm Variations
HINDEMITH:
Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., closed Columbus Day, Monday, Oct. 8). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.