Marie Jacquot conducts A Night at the Opera  featuring the William Tell Overture, April 13

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MARIE JACQUOT

Soloists Julia Radosz and Jonathan Burton join the RI Philharmonic Orchestra

The TACO Classical Series concert is on Saturday, April 13, at 8 p.m.
The Open Rehearsal is on Friday, April 12, at 5:30 p.m.

     The RI Philharmonic Orchestra shares The VETS stage with conductor Marie Jacquot and soloists Julia Radosz, soprano, and Jonathan Burton, tenor, for favorites from the heart of grand opera. The program includes Rossini’s William Tell Overture and Respighi’s Roman Festivals.

***At a Glance***

 A Night at the Opera
TACO Classical Series
Saturday, April 13, 8 p.m.

Marie Jacquot, conductor
Julia Radosz, soprano
Jonathan Burton, tenor

ROSSINI: William Tell (Guillaume Tell): Overture
PUCCINI: E Lucevan le stelle (Tosca), O mio babbino caro (Gianni Schicchi), Quando m’en vo’ (La bohème) and Nessun dorma (Turandot)
PUCCINI (Madama Butterfly): Addio fiorito asil, Un bel di vedremo and Vogliatemi bene
MASCAGNI: Intermezzo from Cavalleria Rusticana
RESPIGHI: Roman Festivals (Feste Romane)

Open Rehearsal
Friday, April 12, 5:30 p.m., at The VETS
General Admission is $15. Tickets are available at tickets.riphil.org or 401.248.7000.

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees). They can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org; in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence; or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., closed President’s Day, Monday, Feb. 18). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more. Questions can be emailed to boxoffice@riphil.org.

About Marie Jacquot, Conductor

Marie Jacquot enjoys exploring wide-ranging repertoire and inspiring delight when performing music. In September 2016, Ms. Jacquot was appointed First Kapellmeister and Deputy Chief Conductor at Mainfranken Theater Würzburg, and was responsible for new productions of Nabucco, The Barber of Seville, Jesus Christ Superstar, Die Csárdásfürstin, and the revival of Idomeneo. In addition, she led performances of Les Huguenots, Die Entführung aus dem Serail, The Merry Wives of Windsor and Bluebeard’s Castle. During 2016, she received wide acclaim for guest performances with the Munich Symphony Orchestra, recreation-orchestra Graz, Rheinische Philharmonie Koblenz, Staatsorchester Darmstadt and Orchestra of Theater Gießen.

For the 2017-18 season, she debuted with the MDR Musiksommer, Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Switzerland’s Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne and Staatstheater Stuttgart for a revival of Medea. She returned to the Bavarian State Opera for the Opera Munich Opera Festival to lead the orchestra for the world premiere of Die Vorübergehenden by Nikolaus Brass and conducted a preview concert for the Bavarian State Orchestra as part of a guest appearance in New York in March 2018.

Educated in Paris where she studied the trombone, Ms. Jacquot holds a degree in conducting from the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna, where she studied under Uroš Lajovic. After receiving several international scholarships, she participated in several conducting forums including Dirigentenforum/Deutscher Musikrat. As a student, Ms. Jacquot came to international acclaim at the Opera Festival Mauritius as Assistant to Peter Rundel for Karlheinz Stockhausen’s Michaels Reise um die Erde as part of the Lincoln Center Festival at Avery Fisher Hall with ensemble musikFabrik Köln. In 2014, she graduated from Vienna’s Musikverein and became the Assistant to Simeon Pironkoff of Ensemble PHACE. She conducted at Ö1-Musiksalon-Composition Prize of Austria’s National Bank, assisted at Klangforum Wien and gave her debut at Konzerthaus with the Vienna Chamber Orchestra. She attracted wide attention as the assistant to GMD Kirill Petrenko at the premiere of Bavarian State Opera’s South Pole. She also took over the musical direction of Tonguecat. She has studied under Nicolas Pasquet, and taken several masterclasses with Sir Simon Rattle, Fabio Luisi and Zubin Mehta.

About the Soloists  

     Soprano Julia Radosz is rapidly establishing herself with the works of Verdi, Mozart and the bel canto genre. Her ability to learn roles quickly and accurately puts her in demand for modern repertoire. She has been praised by Austin XL for a “warm tone and agile phrasing.” Her recent debut of La traviata was met with much enthusiasm for her “astonishing performance, brilliant soprano and thrilling embellishments that were augmented by the most subtle and heart-rending acting.”

In the 2016-2017 season, Ms. Radosz made two role debuts as Musetta, La Bohème, with Wichita Grand Opera, Donna Elvira, Don Giovanni, with Opera Orlando, and premiered the roles of Olympia, A Certain Quiet, and Lydia Larkspur, The Rivals. Other career highlights include Gilda, Rigoletto, Lauretta, Gianni Schicchi, Fiordiligi, Cosi fan tutte, Adina, L’elisir d’amore, Susanna, Le Nozze di Figaro, Antonia, Les contes d’Hoffman, Helena, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Pamina, Die Zauberflote. Ms. Radosz is the winner of the Jenny Lind Competition, Connecticut Concert Opera Competition, Marcella Kochanska Sembrich Vocal Competition, Five Towns Music and Arts Foundation Competition, and received grants from Opera Buffs Foundation, Anna Sosenko and CareerBridges Foundation. She is a dual citizen of Canada and the United States.

Praised by the Des Moines Register as being “full of warmth” and “sturdy,” American tenor Jonathan Burton recently appeared as Pinkerton in Madama Butterfly with the Welsh National Opera, Dick Johnson in La Fanciulla del West with Opera Colorado, Cavoradossi in Tosca with Central City Opera, Rodolfo in La bohème with Palm Beach Opera and Riccardo in Un ballo in maschera with the Florida Grand Opera.

On the concert stage, he has performed René Clausen’s A New Creation with the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, Beethoven’s Symphony No.9 with the Lexington Philharmonic, Handel’s Messiah and Mendelssohn’s Elijah with the Southern Ohio Symphony Orchestra, and Verdi’s Requiem with the Springfield Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Burton studied at Westminster Choir College and the College Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati and was a member of Florida Grand Opera’s Young Artist Program.

About the concert: stories behind the music

Gioacchino Rossini (1792-1868)
Overture to William Tell

Most well-known: In 1828, when Gioacchino Rossini began composing William Tell, he was the world’s most famous living composer. (Beethoven had died the year before.) Rossini had been living in Paris for four years. The French people loved his Italian operas and could not do enough for him, but his own goal was to compose French operas. Listen for this: The final section is the best-known part of the overture due to its association with the 20th-century’s Lone Ranger. Rossini’s intention, however, was to begin with a trumpet fanfare that calls the Swiss people to arms against their oppressors. The following quick march represents the regaining of freedom in the fatherland.

Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924)
Tosca: “E lucevan le stelle”

Trailblazer: Tosca premiered in 1900 and was the first opera by Giacomo Puccini completely modeled on a new trend: verismo (realism). Listen for this: Act III takes place on the roof of Castel Sant’Angelo (the prison). The firing squad leads Cavaradossi in. He has one hour and asks to write a letter. Losing himself in memories of Tosca, he sings “E lucevan le stelle.”

Gianni Schicchi: “O mio babbino caro”

One-act comedy: Gianni Schicchi was a real person of the 14th century mentioned in Dante’s Inferno. He was a lawyer, and in the opera, the greedy family of a recently deceased rich man, who has left all his money to the Church, tries to engage him to substitute a fraudulent will naming them as heirs. Listen for this: Schicchi is reluctant about the fraud at first, but his daughter, Lauretta, wishes to marry Rinuccio, one of the heirs. In the aria “O mio babbino caro” (O, my dear little daddy), she persuades him to reconsider.

La bohème: “Quando m’en vo”

Highly anticipated: At the beginning of 1896, the world was waiting for another opera by Puccini, and on February 1, the world got it, La bohème. Listen for this: The opera’s best-known number is Musetta’s Waltz, “Quando me’n vo’ soletta per la via” (As I go merrily down the street).

Turandot: “Nessun dorma

Puccini’s final work: A composer’s last work is often something unique, even perhaps transcendental. Just think for a moment about Mozart’s Requiem. Luciano Pavarotti made Puccini’s “Nessun dorma” popular. Listen for this: The first words of the aria repeat the words of the chorus.

Madama Butterfly: Excerpts

The story
: Puccini’s Madama Butterfly is about a young Japanese girl, who falls in love with and marries Pinkerton, an American naval officer. Her family rejects her, and she rejects her religion to embrace Pinkerton’s Christianity; to the Japanese, she is a social outcast. Listen for this: At the end of Act I comes Puccini’s longest love duet Vogliatemi bene. The second act takes place three years after Pinkerton, the naval officer, has left. In her child-like devotion to him, she sings the aria, Un bel di, about the day when he will return to claim his bride. When Pinkerton returns, he is unable to outwardly say goodbye to his Butterfly. He bids a tearful farewell to their home in Addio fiorito asti.

Pietro Mascagni (1863-1945)
Intermezzo from Cavalleria Rusticana

One masterwork: Pietro Mascagni was a one-masterpiece composer, and that masterpiece was Cavalleria Rusticana (Rustic Chivalry). Based on a short story, this one-act opera was packed with realism, high emotion and swift action. Listen for this: At the point where the plot is thoroughly established comes the Intermezzo.

Ottorino Respighi (1879-1936)
Roman Festivals (Feste Romane)

Lots of color: There are only a few 20th-century masters of colorful orchestration. Leading composers among this select group, such as Ottorino Respighi, normally worked in a musical style that was a holdover from the colorful 19th century. Listen for this: Two dominant themes run through much of Respighi’s orchestral program music. One is a choice of subject that is sensorially perceived (rather than intellectual). The other is his interest in the remote past. Both are at work in Respighi’s so-called “Roman trilogy,” which includes Fountains of Rome (1917), Pines of Rome (1924) and Roman Festivals (1928). As with Fountains and Pines, the composer wrote notes describing the programmatic content of Roman Festivals.

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The Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School Announces Summer Workshops

Summer 2019 programs include Alternative Strings Ensemble, Piano Plus & Piano Kids, Chamber Music, Jazz Rock & Blues, Trombone Workshops

All workshops held at the RI Philharmonic’s Carter Center for Music Education & Performance, 667 Waterman Ave., East Providence

Chamber Music Workshop
Monday-Friday, June 24-28, 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

The one-week intensive chamber music workshop is for young people and adults who play strings, woodwinds, brass or piano. Although prior chamber music skills are not required, applicants should have good music reading skills. In addition to daily coaching, the program includes rehearsals, masterclasses and performances. Already established chamber groups are welcome, and we offer a one-day enrollment for adults.

 Applications for the Chamber Music Workshop are due May 15. Applications received after May 15 will be handled on a space-available basis. For further information, please call 401-248-7001.

Alternative Strings Ensemble
Tuesdays, July 2-August 27, 6 p.m.-8 p.m.

Alternative Strings Ensemble explores alternative styles and different string playing techniques used in rock, jazz and folk music. Come learn to chop, improvise and play chords on your instrument along with a drummer and keyboard player, then incorporate these into some familiar songs. This group is open to string players with more than three years of experience. Perfect for older strings players that want to have fun and a great challenge for younger players.  No audition required!

Piano Plus & Piano Kids
Monday-Friday, July 29-August 2, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Piano Plus is an opportunity for intermediate and advanced students to enjoy their piano studies in a varied workshop that includes piano four hands, coaching, accompaniment, supervised practicing and music appreciation class. There are daily discussions on many aspects of piano playing including effective practicing, performance preparation, music memorization and more. Piano Plus Workshop will conclude with a recital of all the participants who will be featured accompanying soloists and playing piano pieces for four, six or eight hands.

Piano Kids is designed for young pianists between the ages of six and 10. The day will begin with warm-up piano exercises. Then it will be filled with musical games, daily composer sessions and learning simple duets, which will be performed in a recital.

Applications for Piano Plus and Piano Kids are due May 15. Applications received after May 15 will be handled on a space-available basis. For further information, please call 401-248-7001.

Jazz Rock & Blues Workshop
Week 1: Monday-Friday, July 29 – August 2, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Week 2: Monday-Friday, August 5 – August 9, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

This one or two-week intensive summer workshop gives middle and high school music students the opportunity to develop musicianship, collaborate with their peers and gain confidence in performance. Curriculum includes music theory, improvisation, introduction to a recording studio, styles class for drummers and Latin percussion. Prior jazz, rock and blues experience is not required.

Applications for Jazz Rock & Blues Workshop are due June 15. Applications received after June 15 will be handled on a space-available basis.

 Trombone Workshop
Monday-Tuesday, July 29-30, 1-2:30 p.m.
and Wednesday-Thursday July 31-August 1, 6 p.m.-8 p.m.

Trombone Workshop provides the fundamentals of brass playing and performance of innovative repertoire for low brass ensemble. Alexei Doohovsky is a member of the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra’s trombone section and serves on the faculties of Rhode Island College and Brown University. This workshop welcomes middle and high school students who play trombone, euphonium or tuba.

Please note, that dates and times are subject to change, and will be immediately updated on our website. For further information, please call 401-248-7001.

To register or for more information visit musicschool.riphil.org or contact a Branch Coordinator at 401.248.7001 or cartercenter@riphil.org.

 

 

 

Meet Resident Conductor Francisco Noya: Conducts Beethoven, Janáček and Dvořák March 15 & 16

RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Francisco Noya conducts 

TACO Classical concert, Saturday (March 16), 8 p.m.
 Amica Rush Hour concert, Friday (March 15) at 6:30 p.m.

Soloist Jennifer Frautschi joins the RI Philharmonic Orchestra
for Beethoven’s Violin Concerto

francisconoya-8

FRANCISCO NOYA

About Francisco Noya, Resident Conductor,
RI Philharmonic Orchestra

  • Music Director and Conductor of the New Philharmonia in Newton and Boston Civic Symphony.
  • Member of the conducting faculty at the Berklee College of Music.
  •  Was the Artistic Director of the Berklee Contemporary Symphony Orchestra, from 2008 to 2017.
  • Began his professional career in his native Venezuela as conductor of the Youth Orchestra of Valencia.
  • Held masterclasses for young conductors and collaborated in the training of the youth orchestras.
  • Holds advanced degrees in composition and conducting from Boston University.
  • Appointed Assistant Conductor of the Caracas Philharmonic and assistant to the music director of the Teatro Teresa Carreño.
  • Served as Music Director of the Empire State Youth Orchestra in Albany, Longwood Symphony Orchestra in Boston and Symphony by the Sea in Manchester, Mass.
  • During his 10-year tenure, Mr. Noya led the group on two European tours as well as concerts at both Carnegie Hall in New York City and in Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood.
  • Appeared as guest conductor of the Boston Pops, Baltimore, Nashville, San Antonio and Omaha symphony orchestras.
  • Maintained a busy guest conducting schedule abroad, performing for the past five seasons with the Orquesta Académica of Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as orchestras in Brazil, Peru, Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Spain, Italy and Russia.

 *** At a Glance ***

Beethoven Violin Concerto
TACO Classical Series Concert
Saturday, March 16, 2019
Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Jennifer Frautschi, violin

JANÁČEK: Káťa Kabanová: Overture
BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto
DVOŘÁK: Symphony No.5

Amica Rush Hour Series
Friday, March 15, 6:30 p.m.
Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Jennifer Frautschi, violin

Beethoven Violin Concerto
Friday, March 15, 2019
JANÁČEK: Káťa Kabanová: Overture
BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto

BUY TICKETS

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more. Questions can be emailed to boxoffice@riphil.org.

Meet soloist Jennifer Frautschi: Shares the stage with the RI Philharmonic Orchestra for Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, March 15 & 16

RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Francisco Noya conducts

 
TACO Classical concert, Saturday (March 16), 8 p.m.
 Amica Rush Hour concert, Friday (March 15) at 6:30 p.m.

Frautschi-1-high-res (1)

JENNIFER FRAUTSCHI

About Jennifer Frautschi, violin

  • Two-time GRAMMY nominee and Avery Fisher career grant recipient.
  • Garnered worldwide acclaim as an adventurous musician with a remarkably wide-ranging repertoire.
  • Performed with St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and Tucson Symphony.
  • Made returned engagement with the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra and the Alabama, Arkansas, Belo Horizonte, Chattanooga, Phoenix and Toledo symphonies.
  • Performed at the Ojai, La Jolla, Santa Fe, Moab, Bridgehampton and SaltBay music festivals.
  • Discography included the Stravinsky Violin Concerto with the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Robert Craft, and two GRAMMY-nominated recordings with the Fred Sherry Quartet of Schoenberg’s Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra and the Schoenberg Third String Quartet.
  • Recently released a recording of Romantic Horn Trios, with hornist Eric Ruske and pianist Stephen Prutsman, and the Stravinsky Duo Concertant with pianist Jeremy Denk.
  • Born in Pasadena, Calif., Ms. Frautschi was a student of Robert Lipsett at the Colburn School.
  • Attended Harvard, NEC and Juilliard, where she studied with Robert Mann.
  • Performs on a 1722 Antonio Stradivarius violin known as the ex-Cadiz on generous loan from a private American foundation.

 *** At a Glance ***

Beethoven Violin Concerto
TACO Classical Series Concert
Saturday, March 16, 2019
Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Jennifer Frautschi, violin

JANÁČEK: Káťa Kabanová: Overture
BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto
DVOŘÁK: Symphony No.5

Amica Rush Hour Series
Friday, March 15, 6:30 p.m.
Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Jennifer Frautschi, violin

Beethoven Violin Concerto
Friday, March 15, 2019
JANÁČEK: Káťa Kabanová: Overture
BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto

BUY TICKETS

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more. Questions can be emailed to boxoffice@riphil.org.

Learn the story behind the music for Beethoven Violin Concerto conducted by Francisco Noya, March 15 & 16

TACO Classical concert, Saturday (March 16), 8 p.m.
 Amica Rush Hour concert, Friday (March 15) at 6:30 p.m.

Violinist Jennifer Frautschi performs Beethoven’s Violin Concerto

The stories behind the music

Overture: Káťa Kabanová
LEOŠ JANÁČEK (1854—1928)

In the concert hall, Leoš Janáček is best known for orchestral works like his Sinfonietta and Taras Bulba, a famous string quartet and some piano music. Less well known is his extraordinary output as an opera composer. Through such dramatic masterpieces as Jenůfa, Káťa Kabanová and The Makropulos Case, Janáček earned a reputation as one of the 20th century’s most masterful composers for the lyric theater. Most of Janáček’s operas are serious or tragic in nature. Premiering in 1921, Káťa Kabanová is based on a Russian tale and considered by many to be his greatest theater work.

Káťa Kabanová is the story of conflict between old, traditional European societal practices and newer modern ways and attitudes. It involves two extramarital relationships, one of them involving Káťa. Impending tragedy is apparent in the overture—Káťa’s suicide out of guilt about her feelings and her advances toward Boris, with whom she has fallen in love. This doom is expressed right at the overture’s beginning with a musical idea conveyed by the timpani and strings. Listen for contrasting moods that follow: intense yearning; passion turning to tragedy; folk music (with sleigh bells); intense love in a pastoral setting (a garden); and an ending as quiet and innocent as the beginning.

Violin Concerto in D Major, Op.61
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN (1770—1827
)

“That is all very nice, but now I’d like to hear you play a real violin piece,” was Louis Spohr’s comment to young Joseph Joachim on hearing him play Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in 1855. Spohr’s reaction was natural for a virtuoso of the Romantic era because the concerto by Ludwig van Beethoven is not tailored to display a violinist’s showmanship. Though difficult, it does not test the limits of a player’s technique. As a result, this profound (and, arguably, perfect) violin concerto had been performed only sporadically until Joachim, with the aid of Mendelssohn, began to popularize it in the mid-1840s.

The audience who came to hear the 1806 premiere of Beethoven’s concerto had expected a good show from the soloist, Franz Clement, first violinist and conductor of the Theater an der Wien. He gave it to them. Between the first and second movements of Beethoven’s work, Clement played a sonata of his own, performed on one string with the violin upside down.

The integrity of Beethoven’s concerto stands out in sharp contrast with such empty display. It closely integrates and balances the soloist’s part with the orchestra. Throughout, the composer also devotes attention to balance within the orchestra. Thus, the woodwinds play many passages by themselves, compared with the string section. This feature also provides effective color contrasts with the solo violin.

The serene musical ideas, which determine the expansive first movement, are four-square, hymn-like themes such as Beethoven wrote so naturally during his maturity. The solo violin much of the time is asked to play decorative, lacy elaborations of the main melody. The soloist’s cadenza near the end produces even further elaboration of Beethoven’s ideas.

Serenity turns to contemplation in the second movement. Analyst Donald Tovey characterized this music as “sublime inaction,” because once it starts, there are no sweeping changes. In effect, it is a musical meditation. Tovey continued, “It is impossible to bring the movement to any conclusion except that of a dramatic interruption.”

The “interruption” is a brief passage for the soloist alone that spills into the finale. This concluding movement is dance-like and broad-humored. It has a down-to-earth manner, even in the middle section—a folksy, ballad-style theme. At the same time, it exceeds the preceding movements for fireworks in the solo part, including a full cadenza that includes bravura effects and one humorous poke at virtuosity: the soloist’s two lonely pizzicato notes.

Symphony No.5 in F Major, Op.24
ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK (1841-1904)

 When we think of Antonín Dvořák, we may imagine the standard-bearer of Czech nationalism, weaving the songs and dances of his country into every bar he wrote, even when living in the New World. However, when Dvořák was a young and developing composer, he—like most in his generation—fell under the spell of the New German School, chiefly Franz Liszt and Richard Wagner. Most of Dvořák’s exposure to Wagner was the result of playing the viola in Prague’s National Theater Orchestra for 11 years, nine as principal violist. Wagner’s models influenced his first three symphonies, his early chamber music and his first operas.

However, in early 1874, Dvořák reached a turning point as a composer with Symphony No.4. He had recently married and had left the orchestra to become a church organist.

Poor and with limited prospects, he applied for the Austrian State Prize. Submitting two early symphonies and some chamber music, Dvořák hoped for the best, and the best came to him. He won the grant, which was renewed three times. Also, he became acquainted with Johannes Brahms, who was one of the judges. Brahms introduced Dvořák to Fritz Simrock, his publisher, who then became Dvořák’s publisher. The young composer’s career was launched, and Symphony No.5 in F major was one of the first major works he composed under the patronage of the new stipend.

Listen closely at the very opening of the symphony to the main themes Dvořák introduces, particularly the very first one. (Dvořák’s biographer describe this theme as “expressing the dew-fresh fragrance of a spring morning.”) The composer presents a great amount of the first movement through the full orchestra. However, listen for choice solo or duet passages by the flutes, horns or clarinets.

At the beginning of the second movement, note the slightly sad, yearning quality of the music. This mood melts into something less melancholy with beautiful combinations of instruments. Later statements of the main theme present various moods and musical colors. Dvořák fragments his theme to give us new perspectives just before the quiet ending.

The opening of the third movement is like a sequel to the ending of the second. However, this introduction is brief, and then the main lively, dance-inspired music begins. From Dvořák, we may usually expect some quotation or reference to Czech folk music. This movement is it for the Symphony No.5. Jolly folk dance is what we focus on here.

We are back to utter seriousness in Movement IV, Finale: Allegro molto. Here, listen to the plethora of musical ideas. They contrast, yet they fit together like a well-planned puzzle. The main theme returns frequently, as if to adjudicate the other music competing for our endorsement. Toward the end, Dvořák’s biographer tells us: “Beginning quietly, [the music] quietly, rapidly builds up its core . . . to a climax which blossoms into a broad manifestation of joy and jubilation.”

*** At a Glance ***

Beethoven Violin Concerto
TACO Classical Series Concert
Saturday, March 16, 2019
Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Jennifer Frautschi, violin

JANÁČEK: Káťa Kabanová: Overture
BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto
DVOŘÁK: Symphony No.5

Amica Rush Hour Series
Friday, March 15, 6:30 p.m.
Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Jennifer Frautschi, violin

Beethoven Violin Concerto
Friday, March 15, 2019
JANÁČEK: Káťa Kabanová: Overture
BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto

BUY TICKETS

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees), and can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org, in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence, or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more. Questions can be emailed to boxoffice@riphil.org.

PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. MICHAEL FINK © 2018

RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor Francisco Noya Conducts Beethoven, Janáček and Dvořák, March 15 and 16  

 

Soloist Jennifer Frautschi joins the RI Philharmonic Orchestra
for Beethoven’s Violin Concerto

RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor Francisco Noya leads the Orchestra for Janáček’s Káťa Kabanová: Overture, Dvořák’s Symphony No.5 and Beethoven’s Violin Concerto featuring soloist Jennifer Frautschi, who makes a return engagement to The VETS. The TACO Classical concert, Beethoven Violin Concerto, is on Saturday (March 16) at 8 p.m. The Amica Rush Hour concert is on Friday (March 15) at 6:30 p.m.

“I will always jump at any chance to work with my RI Philharmonic Orchestra colleagues, and I am thrilled to have such an exceptional concert to lead. Together we will be exploring the gorgeous compositions inspired by the Czech musical language. Dvořák’s 5th Symphony, influenced by Germanic traditions, is full of light and humor. Dvorak was a master symphonist whose work is considered central to the orchestral repertoire. With its Slavic connection, Janáček’s music is immersed in the deep musical culture of the Czech nation. I am delighted to be sharing the stage with the talented Jennifer Frautschi who will bring Beethoven’s masterful Violin Concerto to life with her engaging personality and musical mastery.”

Francisco Noya
Resident Conductor, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor

About Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor

Francisco Noya is the Resident Conductor of the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra, and Music Director and Conductor of the New Philharmonia in Newton and the Boston Civic Symphony. An interpreter and educator with broad musical interests, and the knowledge and temperament to explore them, Mr. Noya is on the conducting faculty at the Berklee College of Music. From 2008 to 2017, he was the Artistic Director of the Berklee Contemporary Symphony Orchestra. In that capacity, Mr. Noya led the orchestra through a repertoire that not only included masterworks from the standard symphonic repertoire but explored the potential in collaborations involving deejays, cutting-edge technology and the symphony orchestra.

Mr. Noya began his professional career in his native Venezuela as conductor of the Youth Orchestra of Valencia, one of the original ensembles of “El Sistema,” the internationally admired educational and performing program that promotes social development through music. As a charter member of the program, Mr. Noya also has held master classes for young conductors and collaborated in the training of the youth orchestras.

After earning advanced degrees in composition and conducting from Boston University, Mr. Noya was appointed Assistant Conductor of the Caracas Philharmonic and Assistant to the Music Director of the Teatro Teresa Carreño, one of the most prominent concert halls in Latin America. At his return to the United States, he served as Music Director of the Empire State Youth Orchestra in Albany, New York. During his tenure, Mr. Noya led the group on two European tours as well as in concerts at both Carnegie Hall in New York City and Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood.

Mr. Noya has served as Music Director of the Longwood Symphony Orchestra in Boston, and Symphony by the Sea in Manchester, Mass., and appeared as guest conductor of the Boston Pops, Baltimore, Nashville, San Antonio and Omaha symphony orchestras, among others. He has maintained a busy guest conducting schedule abroad, performing for the past five seasons with the Orquesta Académica of Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as orchestras in Brazil, Peru, Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Spain, Italy and Russia.

 About Jennifer Frautschi, violin

Two-time GRAMMY nominee and Avery Fisher career grant recipient, Jennifer Frautschi has garnered worldwide acclaim as an adventurous musician with a remarkably wide-ranging repertoire. Highlights of her past season included performances with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and Tucson Symphony, as well as return engagements with the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra and the Alabama, Arkansas, Belo Horizonte, Chattanooga, Phoenix and Toledo symphonies. This past summer she performed at the Ojai, La Jolla, Santa Fe, Moab, Bridgehampton and Salt Bay music festivals.

Her discography includes the Stravinsky Violin Concerto with the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Robert Craft, and two GRAMMY-nominated recordings, with the Fred Sherry Quartet, of Schoenberg’s Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra and the Schoenberg Third String Quartet. Her most recent releases are a recording of Romantic Horn Trios, with hornist Eric Ruske and pianist Stephen Prutsman, and the Stravinsky Duo Concertant with pianist Jeremy Denk. With pianist John Blacklow, she will release two discs on Albany Records this year—the first devoted to the Schumann sonatas. The second is an exploration of recent additions to the violin and piano repertoire by American composers.

Born in Pasadena, Calif., Ms. Frautschi was a student of Robert Lipsett at the Colburn School. She also attended Harvard, NEC and Juilliard, where she studied with Robert Mann. She performs on a 1722 Antonio Stradivarius violin known as the ex-Cadiz on generous loan from a private American foundation.

About the concert: stories behind the music

Leoš Janáček (18541928)
Káťa Kabanová: Overture

Opera work: In the concert hall, Leoš Janáček is best known for orchestral works like his Sinfonietta and Taras Bulba, a famous string quartet and some piano music. Less well known is his extraordinary output as an opera composer. Through such dramatic masterpieces as Jenůfa, Káťa Kabanová and The Makropulos Case, Janáček earned a reputation as one of the 20th century’s most masterful composers for the lyric theater.
Listen for this: Doom is expressed right at the overture’s beginning with a musical idea conveyed by the timpani and strings. Listen for contrasting moods that follow: intense yearning; passion turning to tragedy; folk music (with sleigh bells); intense love in a pastoral setting (a garden); and an ending as quiet and innocent as the beginning.

Ludwig van Beethoven (17701827)
Violin Concerto in D Major, Op.61

Even and steady: It closely integrates and balances the soloist’s part with the orchestra. Throughout, the composer also devotes attention to balance within the orchestra. Thus, the woodwinds play many passages by themselves, compared with the string section. This feature also provides effective color contrasts with the solo violin.
Listen for this: The soloist’s cadenza near the end produces even further elaboration of Beethoven’s ideas. Serenity turns to contemplation in the second movement. Analyst Donald Tovey characterized this music as “sublime inaction,” because once it starts, there are no sweeping changes.

Antonín Dvořák (18411904)
Symphony No.5 in F Major, Op.24

Prize winner: Poor and with limited prospects, he applied for the Austrian State Prize. Submitting two early symphonies and some chamber music, Dvořák hoped for the best, and the best came to him. He won the grant, which was renewed three times. Also, he became acquainted with Johannes Brahms, who was one of the judges. Brahms introduced Dvořák to Fritz Simrock, his publisher, who then became Dvořák’s publisher. The young composer’s career was launched, and Symphony No.5 in F major was one of the first major works he composed under the patronage of the new stipend.
Listen for this: The composer presents a great amount of the first movement through the full orchestra. However, listen for choice solo or duet passages by the flutes, horns or clarinets.

 *** At a Glance ***

Beethoven Violin Concerto
TACO Classical Series Concert
Saturday, March 16, 2019

Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor
Jennifer Frautschi, violin

JANÁČEK: Káťa Kabanová: Overture
BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto
DVOŘÁK: Symphony No.5

Beethoven Violin Concerto
Amica Rush Hour Series
Friday, March 15, 6:30 p.m.

Francisco Noya, RI Philharmonic Orchestra’s Resident Conductor=
Jennifer Frautschi, violin

JANÁČEK: Káťa Kabanová: Overture
DVOŘÁK: Scherzo: Allegro scherzando
BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto

Buy Tickets

Tickets start at $15 (including all fees). They can be purchased online at tickets.riphil.org; in person from the RI Philharmonic Orchestra Box Office in East Providence; or by phone 401.248.7000 (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., closed President’s Day, Monday, Feb. 18). On day of concerts only, tickets are also available at The VETS Box Office (Friday, 3:30 p.m.–showtime; Saturday, 4 p.m.-showtime). Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more. Questions can be emailed to boxoffice@riphil.org.

 

Learn more about the conductor for ‘Star Wars: A New Hope in Concert’ with the RI Philharmonic Orchestra, March 9

Lucas Richman conducts Composer John Williams’ Score
for Star Wars: A New Hope (1977)

Performed Live to Film in HD
with 
RI Philharmonic Orchestra at PPAC, March 9

Tickets available at PPACRI.ORG

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About Lucas Richman, conductor

  • Grammy award-winner
  •  Served as Music Director for the Bangor Symphony Orchestra since 2010.
  • Held Music Director position for  Knoxville Symphony Orchestra from 2003-2015.
  • In 2010, John Williams invited him to lead the three-month national summer tour of Star Wars in Concert.
  • Appeared as guest conductor with numerous orchestras including:
    • New York, Los Angeles, Oslo and Zagreb philharmonics
    • Boston Pops
    • Philadelphia, New Jersey, Baltimore and Indianapolis symphonies
    • Canada’s National Arts Centre
    • Toronto, Iceland, Zhejiang symphony orchestras
    • Russian National Orchestra
    • SWR Radio Orchestra of Kaiserslautern
    • Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional
    • Conducting highlights for the 2018-19 season include programs with the Orlando Philharmonic and the Israel Camerata Orchestra Jerusalem.

BUY TICKETS

Tickets for Star Wars: A New Hope in Concert are on sale via PPACRI.ORG, (401)421-ARTS (2787), or at the Providence Performing Arts Center Box Office
at 220 Weybosset Street, Providence.

The Star Wars: Film Concert Series is produced under license by Disney Concerts in association with 20th Century Fox and Warner/Chappell Music.
STAR WARS and related properties are trademarks and/or copyrights, in the United States and other countries, of Lucasfilm Ltd. and/or its affiliates. © & TM